3D

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3D

(1) For stereoscopic 3D concepts, see 3D visualization and 3D rendering.

(2) (3Dimensional) Objects that are rendered visually on paper, film or on screen in three planes representing width, height and depth (X, Y and Z). In the computer, a 2D drawing program can be used to illustrate a 3D object; however, in order to interactively rotate an object in all axes, it must be created as a 3D drawing in a 3D drawing program. See 3D modeling, 3D animation and 3D graphics. Contrast with 2D.


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References in periodicals archive ?
Like the early cinema itself, 3-D is often regarded as a form of spectacle that exists in an antagonistic relationship to narrative integration, and punctures the spatial separation of audience and screen so crucial to the voyeuristic pleasures of the classical mode.
Completed in late 1953, just as the production output of 3-D movies in that period was in decline, “Dragonfly Squadron” was only released in a 2-D version.
The process of 3-D printing is an involved one, but the museum offers in-depth classes and workshops for youth and adults.
LMI Technologies, Canada, has seen a growth in snapshot 3-D scanning, which has driven much interest in the desktop, industrial and consumer 3-D scanning markets.
Zone, perhaps the foremost 3-D historian, followed his aforementioned volume with one covering 1953-2009, entitled 3-D Revolution: The History of Modern Stereoscopic Cinema.
"The first 3-D shoot I shot in my life, I had a dozen and a half arrows when I started, and by the time I went home I think I had three arrows," said Cockrum, the former Bowmen's president.
Julie Turnock's article, "Removing the Pane of Glass: The Hobbit, 3-D High Frame Rate Filmmaking, and the Rhetoric of Digital Convergence," provides a historical analysis of high frame rate filmmaking (HFR) as a special effect technique that has been used most recently by the industry as one of several promotional strategies for both enhancing the experience of 3-D and mitigating viewer skepticism that this experience is worth the higher ticket prices charged to see a film in this format.
The 3-D TV projections for 2011 are only the beginning.
In his presentation "3-D - seeing is believing", Mr Hocking showcased some of Sony's 3D games.
scrapped plans to convert "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1" to 3-D. He also hopes they abandon their 3-D plans for "Part 2," due in theaters next July.