30 Doradus


Also found in: Dictionary.

30 Doradus

(dŏ-ray -dŭs, -rah -) (Tarantula nebula; NGC 2070) A very extensive very luminous emission nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that is a grouping of H II regions characterized by rapid complex motions. It is the brightest object (absolute magnitude –19) in the LMC and is visible to the naked eye. It is also the strongest radio source in the LMC. The most luminous object in the nebula, both at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, lies near the center and is called R136. It is surrounded by dozens of fainter yet still very bright stars. R136 has at least three components, designated a, b, and c. R136a, the brightest component, is an intense UV source with a powerful stellar wind. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope have shown that R136a is an extremely dense cluster of at least 12 massive young O stars within a region only 0.25 parsecs across.

30 Doradus

[¦thər·dē də′rä·dəs]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
Though all of them are relatively young, the ages of the stars in the Hubble image of 30 Doradus vary.
Lead author Fabian Schneider, a Hintze Research Fellow in the University of Oxford's Department of Physics, said: 'We were astonished when we realised that 30 Doradus has formed many more massive stars than expected.'
30 Doradus 016 is a refugee from the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.
The massive binary star R144 can be found in an outer area of the star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
This scale can be compared to the physical diameter of a well-known HII region in our Galaxy, that is, the Orion nebula (D ~ 8 pc), or to the extent of what is considered prototypes of extragalactic giant HII regions, such as 30 Doradus (D ~ 200 pc) or NGC 604 (D ~ 460 pc).
What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus (also known as the Tarantula Nebula) has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years.
"We now know that in many star-forming regions, such as 30 Doradus, you find such pillars," Livio adds.
Observations show that when they were bursting into life, the majority of these galaxies were small, just a few hundred light-years across--comparable to the size of individual star-forming regions in the Milky Way and its companions, such as 30 Doradus (Tarantula Nebula; S&T: Nov.
Some of the New Zealand observations include mapping 30 Doradus, or the Tarantula Nebula, in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud.
Also, there is an unusually large number of high-velocity stars around 30 Doradus. Astronomers believe that these stars, often called "runaway stars" were expelled from the core of 30 Doradus as the result of dynamical interactions.
It was a brilliant burst of light near the object 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud last February that first called attention to the explosion of the nearest supernova in almost 400 years.