stereoscopy

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Stereoscopy

The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes, producing a visual experience of the third dimension, that is, a vivid perception of the relative distances of objects in space. In this experience the observer seems to see the space between the objects located at different distances from the eyes.

Stereopsis, or stereoscopic vision, is believed to have an innate origin in the anatomic and physiologic structures of the retinas of the eyes and the visual cortex. It is present in normal binocular vision because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object points in space are slightly different in the two eyes. The stereoscope, with which different pictures can be presented to each eye, demonstrates the fundamental difference between stereoscopic perception of depth and the conception of depth and distance from the monocular view. See Vision

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stereoscopy

[‚ster·ē′äs·kə·pē]
(physiology)
The phenomenon of simultaneous vision with two eyes in which there is a vivid perception of the distances of objects from the viewer; it is present because the two eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object are slightly different in the two eyes. Also known as stereopsis; stereoscopic vision.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stereoscopy

stereoscopy
The art and science that deals with the use of binocular vision for the observation of a pair of overlapping photographs or other perspective views. It also deals with the methods by which viewing is produced.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

stereoscopic 3D

The rendering of still and moving images with lifelike depth, such as a 3D movie. Depending on the technology, the viewer may be required to wear eyeglasses or not. For details, see 3D visualization and 3D rendering.

The Other 3D
Stereoscopic 3D differs from designing in 3D, in which objects have width, height and depth but do not have the illusion of genuine depth. See 3D modeling and CAD.
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