4-aminopyridine


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4-aminopyridine

[¦fȯr ə‚mē·nō′pī·rə‚dēn]
(organic chemistry)
C5H6N2 White crystals with a melting point of 158.9°C; soluble in water; used as a repellent for birds. Abbreviated 4-AP.
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Most common chemicals that are used as avicides are DRC-1339 (chemically known as 3-chloro-4-methylaniline hydrochloride or starling), CPTH (3-chloro-p-toluidine), Avitrol (4-aminopyridine) and Chloralose among others.
To this solution, 1 [micro]M tetradotoxin (TTX) (Alexis Biochemicals (USA)) was added to block sodium currents, 1mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (Sigma Aldrich), 1mM tetraethyl ammonium (TEA) (Fluka) to block [I.sub.KDR] and [I.sub.A] currents, respectively, as well as 2 mM cesium (Cs) (Sigma Aldrich) to block nonspecific cation channel currents ([I.sub.h]) activated by hyperpolarization.
However, an agent such as 4-aminopyridine raises intracellular pH and mobilizes stored [Ca.sup.2+] and leads to sperm hyperactivation (18).
Fampridine or 4-aminopyridine is a broad-spectrum blocker of the Kv1 family of voltage-gated potassium channels that is used as a symptomatic therapy for patients with certain neuromuscular disorders to enhance synaptic neuronal conduction (1).
*Except for subject A, who had been taking 4-aminopyridine (Ampyra[R]) for 5 years at the time of enrollment, none were on neuromodulatory medication (e.g., baclofen).
1980s explored the impact of 4-aminopyridine on nerve fibers and
Stockand, "Inhibition of neuronal degenerin/epithelial [Na.sup.+] channels by the multiple sclerosis drug 4-aminopyridine," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
This solution contains 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium (TEA), 3 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), 50 nM charybdotoxin, 10 mM glibenclamide (Glib), and 100 nM apamin.
Tapia, "Paired pulse facilitation is turned into paired pulse depression in hippocampal slices after epilepsy induced by 4-aminopyridine in vivo," Neuropharmacology, vol.
Outward currents include rapidly activated and inactivated transient currents such as A-type [K.sup.+] (KA) channel currents, which are highly sensitive to 4-aminopyridine, and slowly inactivated or noninactivated currents such as delayed rectifying [K.sup.+] (KDR) channel currents, which are rarely inactivated and are tetraethylammonium- (TEA-) sensitive due to their unique properties.
In an animal experiment, the Kv channel could be blocked by 4-aminopyridine and cause contractions in the nonpregnant mouse myometrium.