4D printing

4D printing

Using a 3D printer to create objects that change their shape when removed from the printer. Invented at MIT in 2013, the purpose is to make things self-assemble when exposed to air, water or heat due to the chemical interaction of the materials used in their manufacture. A more dramatic goal is have the objects oscillate in some fashion on their own. The 4th dimension moniker refers to the self-transformation. See 3D printing.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new process, known as 4D Printing, is being developed via a research collaboration between the Education and R&D departments of Stratasys, Eden Prairie, Minn.
The newly launched fund will target new businesses in the fields of artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and 4D printing, among others.
Critical technologies to be considered include: 4D printing,
This new approach significantly simplifies and increases the potential of 4D printing by incorporating the mechanical programming post-processing step directly into the 3D printing process.
In this catalog, Brownell, an architect, author, educator, and scholar for advanced materials for architecture and design, brings together material technologies that will impact the future of architecture and design, from augmented skin to 4D printing, and including products, assemblies, processes, and applications.
Fields such as computerised numerical control (CNC) prefabrication and new methods of 3D and 4D printing will also become increasingly common.
Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences developed a 4D printing process inspired by the behavior of natural plant structures.
But 4D printing has an even more exciting interpretation: a 4D printing teachinque first invented at MIT in 2013 consists of smart materials that adapt and reprogramme their properties, functionality or shape on demand, based upon external stimuli (such as submersion in water, or exposure to heat, pressure, current, ultraviolet light, or some other source of energy).
While that can obviously refer to 3D and 4D printing, in what other ways are we making the future right now?
All of these may be possible with 4D printing, the convergence of smart materials and 3D printing technology, which promises to change not only how things get made but what they can do.
New 4D printing refers to self-assembling 3D printed objects and was somewhat jokingly coined by Skylar Tibbets from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
3D products are no longer a fantasy, printing human cells is now possible with numerous application in medicine and 4D printing will make possible the existence of a new generation of products that can alter themselves in response to environmental changes.