Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 5-alpha reductase inhibitors are known to lower a person's level of dihydrotestosterone, which can contribute to prostate cancer growth.
In most men, a simple workup is sufficient to initiate first-line treatments such as behavioural modification and pharmacotherapy (e.g., alpha-blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, or antimuscarinics) depending on the initial assessment.
FDA Drug Safety Communication: 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may increase the risk of a more serious form of prostate cancer.June9 2011http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm258314.htm.
FDA Drug Safety Communication: 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may increase the risk of a more serious form of prostate cancer.9juin 2011http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm258314.htm.
Early use of drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may reduce the risk of clinical progression in men taking an alpha-blocker medication for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate), suggests a study in the August issue of Pharmacy & Therapeutics.
This is where cytoreduction comes in; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), antiandrogens + 5-ARIs or LHRHa can provide 17, 31 and 40% volume reductions with variable degrees of libido loss, fatigue and hot flashes.[sup.10] However, most men are not keen to expose themselves to these side effects and the costs of these medications are significant, even short term.
For men with demonstrable prostate enlargement and higher PSA levels, drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) may be prescribed.
Dutasteride and finasteride belong to a class of medications known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), used to shrink the prostates of men with benign prostate enlargement.
Finasteride is in a class of medications known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs), used to treat benign prostate enlargement (BPH).
Some of them may be at risk of being diagnosed with cancer, and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors reduce that risk."
Drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate), do not increase men's risk of hip fracture, according to a study in the Oct.
Finasteride, marketed as Proscar and the hair-loss drug Propecia, is in a class of drugs known as 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, which are used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate).

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