56 kbps

56 kbps

(communications)
(56 kilobits per second) The data capacity of a normal single channel digital telephone channel in North America. The figure is derived from the bandwidth of 4 kHz allocated for such a channel and the 16-bit encoding (4000 times 16 = 64000) used to change analogue signals to digital, minus the 8000 bit/s used for signalling and supervision.

At the end of 1997 there were two rival modem designs capable of this rate: k56flex and US Robotics' X2. In February 1998 the ITU proposed a 56kbps standard called V.90, which is expected to be formally approved during September 1998.
References in periodicals archive ?
The modem provides online voice playback and recording, 300 bps to 56 kbps data rates, 14.4 kbps fax and a hot-swappable USB interface.
* IW DAMA offers improved TDMA, time slot/burst rate efficiencies, and can now support a 56 kbps data circuit over the traditional DAMA 2.4kbps.
Standard features include caller ID, line-in-use, extension pickup, call-waiting, remote hang-up detection, data rates from 300 to 56 Kbps, 14.4 Kbps fax rate, and voice playback and recording capability.
government defines "high speed" as the capability to send and receive data at speeds of at least 200 Kbps in one direction, while a typical "dial-up" connection moves data at approximately 56 Kbps. The DSL and cable-modem Internet services, used by growing numbers of U.S.
Most Latin American consumers are still using analog modems to connect to the Internet at connection speeds of 28 kbps or 56 kbps. Probe said that analog would probably remain the main connection choice for the near future.
But while dial-up Internet service, which tops out at 56,000 bits per second (or 56 Kbps), is acceptable for sending and receiving emails and other small packets of data, it is becoming glacially slow for the growing number of people who using the Internet for more than electronic letters.
System requirements for the four new courses are a minimum 56 Kbps Internet connection and a PC with speakers.
Capacities internal to and external to the ACE vary, and can include those as low as 4.6 Kbps for a simple local area network (LAN) connection to pass text messages between systems; up to 56 Kbps to support multiple types of digital data moving among the ACE network; all the way through a T1 (1.544 Mbps) type circuit that can support multiple high-speed, high-capacity requirements such as video teleconference (VTC), and just about anywhere in between.
a provider of remote asset management solutions for fixed and mobile assets, has introduced 56 Kbps (Kilobits per second) IML 560 and 14.4 Kbps IML 144 wireline modems for industrial applications.