56 kbps

56 kbps

(communications)
(56 kilobits per second) The data capacity of a normal single channel digital telephone channel in North America. The figure is derived from the bandwidth of 4 kHz allocated for such a channel and the 16-bit encoding (4000 times 16 = 64000) used to change analogue signals to digital, minus the 8000 bit/s used for signalling and supervision.

At the end of 1997 there were two rival modem designs capable of this rate: k56flex and US Robotics' X2. In February 1998 the ITU proposed a 56kbps standard called V.90, which is expected to be formally approved during September 1998.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maximum speed, as explained above, is 56 Kbps, but its effective speed is slower.
Maximum downstream speed remains at 56 kbps under the new specification.
The first rung on the ladder of greater access is analog modems such as the 56 Kbps, which operate through your POTS.
Next month should see an international standard covering 56 Kbps modems .
6 Kbps data channel throughput to approximately 56 Kbps.
Most importantly, there are competing standards for 56 kbps modems.
For the past year, modern makers have been promising to take the creep out of the Internet with their proposed higher speed 56 Kbps models.
The 3310 Mark II VCOE is designed to operate in increments of 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps up to a single full 1.
The ability of the XE5620SM to provide global connectivity up to 56 kbps in a low-cost, highly integrated miniature open circuit board module makes it ideal for cost-sensitive designs in OEM remote monitoring and diagnostic applications.
In comparison to other internet connections, it's 643 times faster than the current top of the line 56 Kbps modems, 281 times faster than ISDN, 141 times faster than DSL (at 256 Kbps), and 32 times faster than cable modems (at 1,000 Kbps).
In comparison to other internet connections, it's 643 times faster than current top of the line 56 Kbps modems, 281 times faster than ISDN, 141 times faster than DSL (at 256 Kbps), and 32 times faster than cable modems (at 1,000 Kbps).
More people currently connect at 56 Kbps than any other Web speed, jumping 87 percent in the past year.