conventional memory

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conventional memory

(storage)
The first 640 kilobytes of an IBM PC's memory. Prior to EMS, XMS, and HMA, real mode application could use only this part of the memory.

conventional memory

In a PC, the first 640K of memory. The next 384K is called the "upper memory area" (UMA). The term may also refer to the entire first megabyte (1,024K) of RAM, which is the memory that DOS could directly manage without the use of additional memory managers. See DOS memory manager.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this time, the industry was growing and everybody was sick of the 640k barrier and Intel architecture (which we still live with today).
To solve this problem Lotus called Intel, the manufacturer of the PC's microprocessor, and later Microsoft, to develop a paged memory system that would allow the PC to circumvent the 640K barrier. The result was the Expanded Memory Specification, which could access a new kind of memory board that allowed DOS programs to access 8 megabytes of RAM.(7) Expanded memory performs its magic by taking advantage of the unused spaces available in Upper Memory.
Its biggest negative is the DOS 640k barrier. I was really impressed when I upgraded my old Dragon-32 computer to a massive 64k.
"Windows 3.0 will stimulate the market tremendously because it breaks the 640K barrier. All the other changes are cosmetic, including an improved user interface for the desktop manager.
Having gained access to the 80386's powerful 32-bit, multitasking architecture and massive RAM, Versacad/386 is able to break the 640K barrier that's haunted PC users for years and generate the kind of 3-D graphics that have been possible so far primarily on workstation-class or better machines.