8-track tape


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8-track tape

An earlier magnetic tape cartridge technology introduced by Lear Jet in 1964 as Stereo 8, although widely known by its 8-track moniker. Stereo 8 was an 8-track version of the 4-track Muntz Autostereo, the first commercial music player for a car. Stereo 8 allowed two stereo recordings on the same tape providing a similar experience to flipping over an LP record of the era. The 1966 Ford Mustang was the first car with a built-in 8-track player, and aftermarket units became widely available. See magnetic tape.


Eight-Track Cartridges
The Stereo 8 was a continuous loop cartridge with the tape always moving in the same direction. By the late 1980s, the more convenient audio cassettes replaced the 8-track world. See audio cassette.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(We can only hope that the AAVSO's software wizard, Grant Foster, will convert the program into Windows format before the VSTAR diskette becomes as unplayable as an 8-track tape.)
They'll eventually fade away like 8-track tape players.
If you don't believe that, jump in your Packard, plug in an 8-track tape and cruise confidently into oblivion - there are plenty of others out there who think the future is something you should shape rather than be shaped by.
Its computers have 240,000 times less memory than a low-end iPhone, and it sports an 8-track tape recorder.
-- The spacecraft's technology was laughable by today's standards: It carried an 8-track tape recorder and computers with 240,000 times less memory than a low-end iPhone.
Remember the 8-track tape and how that gave way to the cassette tape?
"The TV is an 8-track tape, the computer is your CD," Kitze said.
O'Neill added air conditioning to his, though it does sport an 8-track tape player.
Allen began by reminiscing about the "state of information" 25 years ago: Only three television networks, no cable TV or remote control, no USA Today, audio products limited to vinyl records and 8-track tape, and no commercial online databases or personal computers.
In the mid-1960s, along came cassettes and 8-track tapes, making it easy to play your favourite tunes in the comfort of your car.
Many of you who are of a certain age may remember the 1960s television cabinets that came with built-in speakers, a record player on one side and a bar cabinet on the other, the 1970s beds that had speakers on the headboards and a slot for your 8-track tapes or the massaging beds that made you feel like hurling especially after dinner and a couple of cocktails.
I grew up in the 60s and 70s, so for me a big technology breakthrough was when cassettes replaced 8-track tapes. I refuse to move on from CDs.