802.11ad

802.11ad

An IEEE Wi-Fi standard for short range transmission in the 57 to 71 GHz frequency range. Introduced in 2012, the 802.11ad speed rating is 4.6 Gbps, which is more than three times 802.11ac's Wave 1 top speed of 1.3 Gbps (see 802.11ac). However, 11ac was designed as a next generation wireless LAN, whereas 11ad is more of a short range cable replacement (see WiGig).

802.11ay
Expected in 2020, 802.11ay is a proposed enhancement to 802.11ad that quadruples bandwidth and adds four streams of MIMO. 11ay also extends the distance to several hundred meters. See WiGig, MIMO and 802.11.
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As consumers demand wireless videos and data continues to grow, 802.11ad in the 60GHz spectrum shall provide more enhanced network capacity that makes it a feasible extension for the congested 2.4GHz/5GHz Wi-Fi spectrum.
This product supports the powerful Wi-Fi capabilities offered on the Snapdragon 855 Platform by including the Qualcomm 60GHz Wi-Fi chipset (based on the 802.11ad specification) for multi-gigabit speeds and wire equivalent latencies, as well as the Qualcomm 2x2 Wi-Fi 6-ready chipset for next generation capacity, efficiency, and performance at range.
This product supports the powerful Wi-Fi capabilities offered on the Snapdragon 855 Platform by including the QualcommA 60GHz Wi-Fi chipset (based on the 802.11ad specification) for multi-gigabit speeds and wire equivalent latencies, as well as the QualcommA 2x2 Wi-Fi 6-ready chipset for next generation capacity, efficiency, and performance at range.
Apparently, the introduction of WiGig (802.11ad), a new high-speed Wi-Fi standard, "into any mobile product brings new and unanticipated challenges."
Wireless PON takes fibre within a few metres (typically 100) of the point of consumption, and then uses 60 Ghz 802.11ad wireless drops to deliver connectivity, avoiding the need to take fibre into individual buildings and lowering the deployment's cost per user.