802.11ah


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802.11ah

An IEEE Wi-Fi standard providing low-power, long-range wireless transmission for smart home and IoT (Internet of Things) devices. Also called "Wi-Fi HaLow" (pronounced "hay-lo") and employing cognitive radio techniques, 802.11ah transmits up to one kilometer, considerably more than regular Wi-Fi.

Similar to 802.11af
The 802.11ah and 802.11af standards both penetrate walls like over-the-air TV signals. However, 11ah transmits at 900 MHz in the unlicensed frequency band, whereas 802.11af operates in the TV white space bands. See 802.11af, 802.22 and cognitive radio.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its application, 802.11ah technology can accommodate devices or stations in large numbers and every station has their movement pattern such as static or mobile user characteristics.
This article contains the following content: section 2 contains brief description of the new standard of IEEE 802.11ah. In section 3, there are very simply described two simple ways of shielding of this type of wireless communication.
The IEEE 802.11ah standard extends the utility of the wi-fi standard by adding features designed to meet the unique requirements of M2M and IoT applications.
IEEE has come out with IEEE 802.11ah. Based on that, Wi-Fi Alliance announced Wi-Fi HaLow in Consumer Electronics Show Las Vegas earlier this year.
Unlike the older and more familiar 802.11 protocols, which mostly use the 2.4 or 5GHz bands, 802.11ah is a sub-gigahertz protocol that uses the 900MHz band.
The Wi-Fi Alliance believes Wi-Fi HaLow -- which is an extension of the 802.11ah protocol -- offers comparable performance to Bluetooth but convincing device makers to make the switch is going to be a challenge.
Integrating a half-watt power amplifier (PA), low noise amplifier (LNA), antenna switch and all impedance matching networks into a single-chip/single-die CMOS device and assembled in a tiny 3x3mm QFN (Quad-Flat Non-Lead) package, the RFX1010 is the ideal RF front-end solution for both 920IP, as well as the emerging IEEE 802.11ah standard based applications.
"So they have been working on what they call a local lower power wifi in 802.11ah. And they see that with a lot of experience in consumer markets they can leverage it into places such as health centres and telehealth services." There are also plans to bring it into other parts of the home
It supports standards such as LTE Advanced and 802.11ah with the same Anritsu solution."
IEEE 802.11ah standard was released to support wireless network scenario with multiple connected devices, large coverage areas, and limited energy consumption.