802.11b


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802.11b

(networking)
An IEEE wireless local area networks (WLAN) standard protocol which speaks DSSS at 2.4GHz. 802.11b is one of the two wi-fi protocols. It operates at 11 megabits per second (Mbps) compared with 802.11g which operates at 54 Mbps.

802.11

The Wi-Fi standards. IEEE 802.11 standards cover every version of Wi-Fi, and the Wi-Fi Alliance, certifies products. Wi-Fi is the wireless counterpart to "wired" Ethernet, and Wi-Fi and Ethernet co-exist in every home and business.

All versions of 802.11 use OFDM encoding except for 802.11b, which uses DSSS (see OFDM and spread spectrum). For details about each standard, see below and 802.11 versions.

Infrastructure and Ad Hoc Modes
In "infrastructure" mode, Wi-Fi devices transmit to an "access point" (base station), which may be a stand-alone unit or built into a wireless router. In "ad hoc" mode, two devices communicate peer-to-peer without an access point in between (see Wi-Fi Direct).

Throughput Varies
Speed is distance dependent. The farther away the device from the base station, the lower the speed. Also, the actual throughput is generally half of the rated speed because 802.11 uses collision "avoidance" (see CSMA/CA) rather than Ethernet's collision "detection" method (see CSMA/CD). For example, a rated 54 Mbps may yield 27 Mbps in real data throughput. For more about Wi-Fi networks, see wireless LAN and Wi-Fi. See Wi-Fi hotspot, 802.11 timeline, wireless router, ISM band, 802.16 and 802.15.

    802.11 SPECIFICATIONS                Max    Indoor  ChannelWi-Fi   Bands Speed   Range*   Width No.    (GHz) (Mbps)  (ft)     (MHz)1 11b  2.4      11    150  20
 2 11a       5   54     95  20
 3 11g  2.4      54    170  20
 4 11n  2.4, 5  150**  230  20/40
 5 11ac      5  433*** 230  20/40/80/160
 6 11ax 2.4, 5  600*** 230  20/40/80/160

  ** = Per antenna at 40 MHz channels.
 *** = Per antenna at 80 MHz channels.


Stand-Alone Access Points
Wi-Fi access points (APs) are central base stations with antennas. These examples are stand-alone APs (ceiling mounted and desktop). They are generally not found in homes because an AP is already built into the wireless router.


Stand-Alone Access Points
Wi-Fi access points (APs) are central base stations with antennas. These examples are stand-alone APs (ceiling mounted and desktop). They are generally not found in homes because an AP is already built into the wireless router.







Wi-Fi Adapters
The adapter (top) adds Wi-Fi to any computer via USB, while the card on the bottom plugs into a PCI slot inside a desktop computer. (Images courtesy of D-Link Corporation and TP-LINK Technologies Co., Ltd.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The biggest amount of conversations is achieved using G.723.1 with the network bandwidth of 11 Mbps for 802.11b and 54 Mbps for 802.11g standards.
A big advantage is its backward compatibility with 802.11b. This compatibility carries legacy issues that reduce the throughput when compared to 802.11 a by about 21 percent.
Pre-N is compatible with the older 802.11g and 802.11b standards and they will work at standard speeds with older equipment.
Today, I'd strongly recommend 802.11g, given its faster performance and its flexibility in supporting existing 802.11b equipment.
802.11g has data rates higher than 802.11b, but similar to 802.11a.
This technology is newer, tends to be more expensive and the devices and equipment are not compatible or interchangeable with the 802.11b standard.
The Workabout Pro boasts simultaneous support of WAN, 802.11b and Bluetooth connectivity, and also boasts that it delivers reliable performance, even in harsh environments, with an IP54 rating and ability to withstand drops from four feet to concrete.
For example, in a single household, the son can watch a streaming video from an 802.11a-enabled media center or personal video recorder (PVR), while the daughter uses an 802.11b PDA to instant message friends, and at the same time Mom or Dad is using an 802.11g embedded mini-PCI card in a laptop to check e-mails over the VPN.
As of today, there are four--with 802.11b having the largest company install-base.
The current standard--labeled 802.11b, to be exact--is relatively slow-acting and easy to intercept by passersby, as compared with the newly emerging standards, such as 802.11a and, farther down the road, 802.1lg.
You can go with 802.11b, which is pretty popular and widely used, or you can go with 802.11g, which is speedier and full-backward compatible with the "b" standard.