80286

80286

286

The second generation of the Intel x86 family of CPU chips. The term may refer to the chip or to a PC that used it. Introduced in 1982, it was the successor to the 8088/8086 chips used in the first PCs. The 286 broke the infamous one-megabyte memory barrier, but although faster than the previous generation, it was never capable of supporting Windows and other graphics-based applications. See AT class and x86.

Technical Specs
Type: 16-bit multitasking microprocessor
Transistors: 134,000
Package: 68-pin PGA, PLCC or LCC
Registers: 15 16-bit
Real Mode: Performs as 8086 CPU; addresses 1MB memory.
Protected Mode: Addresses 16MB physical and 1GB virtual memory and provides access to memory protection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Users will need special RLIN terminal-emulation software and 80286 or 80386 PC-based hardware.
But for those with 80286 or higher processors (80386SX, 80386, 80486), there is an even better form of additional memory: extended memory (XMS).
The definition of a Multimedia PC (MPC) is a 80286 or 80386 computer with a built-in CD-ROM drive, a graphical user interface (GUI) such as Windows 3.0, Windows Extensions that enables the machine to control various analog and digital devices, a minimum of 2 megabytes of memory and a 40 megabyte hard disk, a mouse, and 4-bit color graphics at VGA solution.
Users of Knowledge Finder for the PC will need a 2MB 80286 or better, 10MB or large hard drive, mouse, compatible CD-ROM player, and DOS 3.3 or later.
Steps 1 to 7 take approximately thirty minutes on a 10-MHz 80286 AT compatible with a database of 1,200 records.
The Intel 80286 was in charge of the most critical functions of the A320 -- translating the pilot's inputs to climb, descend, and turn -- and yet it would barely turn on a smartphone today ...
EE's May 1989 issue included a description of Rockland Scientific's System/90 FFT Analyzer that used five TMS320C25 DSPs and was hosted by an 80286 PC with an 80287 math coprocessor.
The installed base of x86 microprocessors created by IBM's success in the PC market segment (with Intel's 8088 and 80286 microprocessors) had significantly and fortuitously shifted bargaining power in Intel's favor.
Each vendor that brought out an "IBM Compatible" PC also went to Intel for its processors, the 8088 and 8086 for the first generation of PC compatibles, then as IBM and Compaq introduced new generations of systems, the 80286, 80386, and 80486.
1982 Intel introduces the 80286 chip rated at 12.5MHz.
Hardware requirements are an IBM-PC or compatible with 80286 or higher CPU and 640K RAM.