80386

80386

386

The first 32-bit CPU in, and third generation of, the Intel x86 family. The term may refer to the chip or to a PC that used it. Introduced in late 1985, it was the successor to the 286, and although adequate for DOS, it was slow for Windows and other graphics-based programs. It was the first x86 chip to unify memory management and allocate both extended and expanded (EMS) memory on demand. It also added Virtual 8086 Mode, which allowed multiple DOS applications to be multitasked side-by-side with Protected Mode (32-bit) applications. The 386 architecture was followed in all subsequent x86 chips. See PC and x86.

Technical Specs
Type: 32-bit multitasking microprocessor
Transistors: 275,000 (1.5 micron)
Package: 132-pin PGA
Registers: 32 32-bit
Real Mode: Performs as a 16-bit 8086 CPU; addresses 1MB memory.
Protected Mode: Addresses 4GB physical and 64TB virtual memory; provides access to memory protection and 32-bit instructions.
Virtual 8086 Mode: Protected Mode subset that runs a Real Mode application in a virtual machine.
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It took the second generation of IBM PC-2 Model 80s running Intel's 80386 16-bit microprocessor before he could install a pilot site at 80-bed Neillsburg Hospital in Wisconsin.
Each vendor that brought out an "IBM Compatible" PC also went to Intel for its processors, the 8088 and 8086 for the first generation of PC compatibles, then as IBM and Compaq introduced new generations of systems, the 80286, 80386, and 80486.
The system board has been upgraded to an 80386 processor operating at 16MHz, which makes it five to ten times faster than the Scanner 1130.
I waited for the powerful, upscale version, the 80386. Since a family member worked for IBM, the company that coined the term "PC," I was able to get a hell of a discount -- a bargain at $7,000.
Originally Linux was targeted at only one architecture: the Intel 80386 CPU.
File-Ex works on any 80386 or better IBM compatible PC running Windows 95 or Windows 98.
In 1987, along came Intel's first 32-bit microprocessor, the 80386, and Compaq beat IBM to the market with a desktop computer con-taining it called the Deskpro 386.
Computer manufacturers produced machines with 80386 chips using a 80286 motherboard that meant that although the processor worked faster, the machine could only function at the speed and bit path of the motherboard.
The cola wars continue with advanced micro devices (AMD) and Cyrix currently challenging Intel for the 486 market while Cyrix has also targeted the 80386 market with its Cx486D[Rx.sup.2] upgrade.
To operate efficiently, the Office System requires an MS-DOS compatible 80386, 80486, or Pentium Computer with 4 megabytes of RAM.