Lenore

(redirected from A Paean)

Lenore

“saintly soul floats on the Stygian river.” [Am. Lit.: “Lenore” in Hart, 468]
See: Death

Lenore

the lost love with whom the poet learns that he will nevermore be united. [Am. Poetry: Poe The Raven]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
This quickly took us out of range of Red-Eye, and the last we saw of him was far out on a point of land, where he was jumping up and down and chanting a paean of victory.
In his eyes was a desire to chant a paean. He kept repeating, "They 've held 'em, by heavens!"
Lee's novel is beautifully written, a paean to a bygone era.
"I just couldn't be Doria." The lead track on Woman Dangerous, "Simple Life," is an anthem for Roberts's return, a paean to being yourself and not making apologies.
Poignant and wistful certainly but melancholic and forlorn to boot, the repetitive act of stroking the window through which Manhattan beckons seems an act of obeisance, an acknowledgment of the fractious relationship between Manhattan and Brooklyn, a paean to the city just an arm's reach away, a wish to serve and groom it.
The premiere of Houston Ballet's Tales of Texas, choreographed by the company's new artistic director, Stanton Welch, was a paean to the courage, endurance, and vision of people in America's heartland.
What in a base sense might be taken for a raucous, even perverse homage to the daily is also a paean to the other life, whose variety and strangeness extend the possibilities of our own.
Brokaw's story is a paean to some of the immigrants and their offspring who wrested a living from the uncooperative earth.
In painting, that meaning may be a paean to the grace and beauty of the arrangement of the human body itself, sometimes reclining, sometimes in flight, sometimes dancing or running.
As much a study of how both people and animal companions adapt to life in the Big Apple as it is a paean to pets, the book encompasses a range of New Yorkers, such as modern lesbian couple Carol and Melissa and their pets Stretch, a decorated box turtle, and Tess, a Labrador retriever; street buddies "Hoe" and "Little" and their pit bull, Taz, whom they rescued from an abusive owner; and Rue McClanahan and her Siamese cat, Miss Bianca.
Ian excels at the aching ballad, and besides "memphis" she includes the heartrending breakup song "she must be beautiful" ("so beautiful / to have stolen the wind from my sails") and the gorgeously melodic "days like these," a paean to hope amid resignation that was written, oddly enough, about her troubles with the IRS.