A chain


Also found in: Medical.

A chain

[′ā ‚chān]
(immunology)
References in classic literature ?
At night (the season for which the apartment was especially designed) it was illuminated principally by a large chandelier, depending by a chain from the centre of the sky-light, and lowered, or elevated, by means of a counter-balance as usual; but (in order not to look unsightly) this latter passed outside the cupola and over the roof.
That is a chain of galley slaves, on the way to the galleys by force of the king's orders.
He was bound differently from the rest, for he had to his leg a chain so long that it was wound all round his body, and two rings on his neck, one attached to the chain, the other to what they call a "keep-friend" or "friend's foot," from which hung two irons reaching to his waist with two manacles fixed to them in which his hands were secured by a big padlock, so that he could neither raise his hands to his mouth nor lower his head to his hands.
At first it had appeared to them solitary and detached; but as they advanced towards it, it proved to be the principal summit of a chain of mountains.
One of these they kicked aside, and, unlocking the huge padlock that had held a chain about what had once been a human ankle, they snapped the iron band about my own leg.
A captive at the end of a chain, on the way Michael quickly encountered other captives going in his direction.