A mode

A mode

[′ā ′mōd]
(acoustics)
A form of ultrasonic medical tomography that uses acoustic pulse emissions and echo reception along a single line-of-sight axial propagation path and usually displays the information on a cathode-ray oscilloscope in which the horizontal axis of the display is a linear time base, triggered at the time of the transmitted pulse, and the received echoes are manifested as vertical deflections, with vertical displacement a measure of the amplitude of the strength of the returning echo.
References in classic literature ?
It represents to them a mode of Individualism, an assertion on the part of the artist that he selects his own subject, and treats it as he chooses.
For what is morbidity but a mood of emotion or a mode of thought that one cannot express?
Upon the other hand, the terrible truth that pain is a mode through which man may realise himself exercises a wonderful fascination over the world.
It was necessary that pain should be put forward as a mode of self- realisation.
Positing the existence of a fundamental split between the world of the perceived and its reflection, A initially appears to conceive of experience not as a constitutive nor formative force but rather as a mode of possession in which experience belongs to the subject instead of being part of it.
As David Hume famously argued, it is a mode of persistent sameness within oneself, or the distinct idea that an object "remains invariable and uninterrupted thro' a suppos'd variation of time" (296).
Described by Robin Anderson and Anna Dartington as a mode of "being out of balance" (3) and by Fiona Gardner as a time of transition ruled by "intense feelings" and a "sense of confused identity and unpredictability" (58), adolescence has traditionally been understood as a period dominated by the notion of estrangement or a "feeling of strangeness at one's body changing unbidden" (Brady 8).