A-type star

A-type star

[′ā‚tīp ‚stär]
(astronomy)
In star classification based on spectral characteristics, the type of star in whose spectrum the hydrogen absorption lines are at a maximum. Also known as A star.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a bright A-type star, and RSpec's author warns users to begin with a star of that spectral type.
Open your video or image file of an A-type star and its spectrum.
That's why it's important to use a prominent A-type star for calibration.
The team noticed that the same line features are also observed at SS 433, a close binary consisting of an A-type star and most probably a black hole with a mass less than 10 times that of the Sun.
With almost triple Jupiter's mass but half its density, the exoplanet orbits an A-type star more than twice as massive as our Sun every 18 hours.
The A-type star, KIC 11145123, is more than twice as wide as the Sun.
We have been studying through 3-D global simulations the nature of both differential rotation and dynamo action that can be achieved in G-type stars like the sun by turbulent convection in their outer envelopes, and also by core convection in more massive A-type stars. The richness of structures realized will be discussed, along with their implications to seismic probing of these stars.
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), surveyed about 300 stars, and focussed on those dubbed "retired" A-type stars that are more than one and a half times more massive than the sun.
They focused on those dubbed "retired" A-type stars that are more than one and a half times more massive than the sun.
In the search for giant planets, A-type stars such as Sirius, with its hefty 2 solar masses, make much better targets than dinky M dwarfs such as Barnard's Star, which is only 15% as massive as the Sun.
While about 1 in 6 A-type stars has a Jupiter-mass companion, only about 1 in 50 M dwarfs has a gas-giant planet.
Spectral types break down into three broad classes: white-hot, rapidly burning A-type stars like Sirius; yellowish, Sun-like F-, G-, and K-type stars; and ruddy M dwarfs.