A-type star

A-type star

[′ā‚tīp ‚stär]
(astronomy)
In star classification based on spectral characteristics, the type of star in whose spectrum the hydrogen absorption lines are at a maximum. Also known as A star.
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With almost triple Jupiter's mass but half its density, the exoplanet orbits an A-type star more than twice as massive as our Sun every 18 hours.
The team noticed that the same line features are also observed at SS 433, a close binary consisting of an A-type star and most probably a black hole with a mass less than 10 times that of the Sun.
The A-type star, KIC 11145123, is more than twice as wide as the Sun.
We have been studying through 3-D global simulations the nature of both differential rotation and dynamo action that can be achieved in G-type stars like the sun by turbulent convection in their outer envelopes, and also by core convection in more massive A-type stars.
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), surveyed about 300 stars, and focussed on those dubbed "retired" A-type stars that are more than one and a half times more massive than the sun.
They focused on those dubbed "retired" A-type stars that are more than one and a half times more massive than the sun.
In the search for giant planets, A-type stars such as Sirius, with its hefty 2 solar masses, make much better targets than dinky M dwarfs such as Barnard's Star, which is only 15% as massive as the Sun.
While about 1 in 6 A-type stars has a Jupiter-mass companion, only about 1 in 50 M dwarfs has a gas-giant planet.
He predicts that future imaged planets will most likely reside around massive A-type stars, owing in large part to their youth, brightness, and odds of having a giant planet.
Spectral types break down into three broad classes: white-hot, rapidly burning A-type stars like Sirius; yellowish, Sun-like F-, G-, and K-type stars; and ruddy M dwarfs.