Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, the Health Department of the Western Cape needs to give consideration to coding an alternative ACE inhibitor.
The purpose of the meeting was to determine, according to the agenda, "whether CHARM--Added provides compelling evidence that candesartan should, under some circumstances, be recommended for use in patients on an ACE inhibitor."
The researchers recruited patients older than 50 years with documented coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >40%, excluding patients in poor health, with renal failure, recent unstable angina, or who had recently used an ACE inhibitor. Only patients who tolerated the active drug during a run-in phase were allowed into the study, a step that increases the likelihood of finding a benefit for the drug.
Forty-three percent of patients received the target dose of ACE inhibitor. In a stepwise linear regression model, including all patients discharged with an ACE inhibitor prescription, serum creatinine concentration on discharge (t = -4.1, P [is less than] 0.001) was the only independent predictor of the discharge dose of ACE inhibitor.
* Ask your doctor whether you might benefit from receiving an ACE inhibitor.
At baseline, 19% of the patients were treated with a statin, 25% were treated with a [beta]-blocker, 22% were on aspirin, and 26% received an ACE inhibitor.