attention deficit disorder

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attention deficit disorder

[ə′ten·shən ¦def·ə·sət dis‚ȯr·dər]
(psychology)
A psychiatric disorder of childhood characterized by attention span problems and impulsivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers said athletes with ADHD who were taking stimulant medications responded more slowly at both of those times than those without ADHD on tests of visual motor speed.
Attention, reward, and inhibition: Symptomatic features of ADHD and issues for offenders in the criminal justice system.
"Every diagnosed case of ADHD can't be eradicated with solving mouth-breathing issues, but the parents of children who are mouth breathers and have been diagnosed with ADHD should get a second opinion from a dentist or orthodontist before accepting the ADHD label," Barakat advises.
"Mistaking perfectly normal age-related immaturity for ADHD is just one of the many problems with the label.
ADHD was assessed using a self-reported diagnosis of ADHD.
Unfortunately, ADD and ADHD can cause a person to feel anxious, unorganized, and obsessive, which can create fear of being in public and trigger a person to stay home.
If attention problems have been a lifelong struggle, then a psychiatrist or other mental health professional doing the evaluation is more likely to diagnose ADHD. But Dr.
It's believed ADHD always begins in childhood, so it's likely that if a person is diagnosed later in life, they will have had their symptoms for a long time.
"ADHD is the most common neurodevelopmental disorder, and affects approximately 5%-7% of children and adolescents and 2% of young adults," said lead author Mu-Hong Chen, MD, a physician at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital and the College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei.
The findings have potential to affect millions of children, adolescents and young adults in the United States who have ADHD. The disorder is characterized by difficulty paying attention and concentrating, disorganization, restlessness and impulsive behavior, according to the U.S.
"My ADHD patients sleep a mean of 5-6 hours per night on a chronic basis, versus 7-8 hours in normal individuals.
Although studies have focused on the relationship between clinical symptoms of ADHD and smoking, little is known about the effect of ADHD symptoms on the development of nicotine dependence.