age


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age

1. 
a. a period of history marked by some feature or characteristic; era
b. (capital when part of a name): the Middle Ages; the Space Age
2. Geology palaeontol
a. a period of the earth's history distinguished by special characteristics
b. the period during which a stage of rock strata is formed; a subdivision of an epoch
3. Myth any of the successive periods in the legendary history of man, which were, according to Hesiod, the golden, silver, bronze, heroic, and iron ages
4. Psychol the level in years that a person has reached in any area of development, such as mental or emotional, compared with the normal level for his chronological age
5. of age adult and legally responsible for one's actions (usually at 18 or, formerly, 21 years)

Age

 

in humans, a stage of development that is characterized by specific regularities of formation of the organism and personality and by relatively stable morphophysiological and psychological traits. While age is a stage in the biological maturing of the organism, a process controlled by genetic factors, it is also a concrete result and stage of the social-psychological development of the personality and is determined by the conditions of life, training, and upbringing.

The content and form of training and upbringing are historically composed and varied according to age; in their turn they affect the determination of the boundaries and possibilities of a given age. In contemporary pedagogy and developmental psychology, several ages are differentiated with respect to the known relationships of the boundaries: infancy (from birth to one year); pre-preschool, or early childhood (from one to three); preschool (from three to seven); early school age (from seven to ten years); juvenile, or middle school (from ten to 15); and late school, or early youth (15 to 18 years old). Beyond these limits there is no generally accepted classification in the literature; only old age is considered separately. With the increased longevity noted in the 20th century, gerontology and gerontopsychology have arisen as disciplines to study the problems of prolonging the active life of a human being. Each age has a characteristic structure of cognitive, emotional, and volitional properties and qualities; forms of behavior; types of relationships to the environment; and peculiarities of structure and functioning of various organs and systems of the organism. This structure, however, is not invariable: in the 20th century a general acceleration of the physical and mental development of children has been noted. On the other hand, educational theory, in solving the problem of optimizing training, widens the possibilities of age and the boundaries of acquiring knowledge. Training must take into account not only the level of development achieved but also the development perspectives (the concept of “zones of imminent development,” as formulated by L. S. Vygotskii): the teacher must know not only what is present in a child of a given age but also what can be achieved, given certain conditions, by the child in the near future.

A. V. PETROVSKII

age

[āj]
(biology)
Period of time from origin or birth to a later time designated or understood; length of existence.
(geology)
Any one of the named epochs in the history of the earth marked by specific phases of physical conditions or organic evolution, such as the Age of Mammals.
One of the smaller subdivisions of the epoch as geologic time, corresponding to the stage or the formation, such as the Lockport Age in the Niagara Epoch.

AGE

(aerospace engineering)
References in classic literature ?
As the air I breathe is drawn from the great repositories of nature, as the light on my book is yielded by a star a hundred millions of miles distant, as the poise of my body depends on the equilibrium of centrifugal and centripetal forces, so the hours should be instructed by the ages and the ages explained by the hours.
And there are compositions of the same strain to be found in the books of all ages. What is Guido's Rospigliosi Aurora but a morning thought, as the horses in it are only a morning cloud.
Such things have continued to be made in all ages, and are now, wherever a healthy physique exists; but, as a class, from their superior organization, they have surpassed all.
Beside its primary value as the first chapter of the history of Europe, (the mythology thinly veiling authentic facts, the invention of the mechanic arts and the migration of colonies,) it gives the history of religion, with some closeness to the faith of later ages. Prometheus is the Jesus of the old mythology.
But at my age I can hardly get to the city, and therefore you should come oftener to the Piraeus.
Brooke Olivia age 10 as the Mad Hatter Ysgol Dewi Sant, Rhyl Oliver Ledsham age 7 of Ysgol Merllyn, Bagillt as The Fantastic Mr Fox I'm entirely bonkers - but I'll tell you a secret - all the best people areDylan Walton Aged 3 Dosbarth Glas at St Winefrides in Holywell Franklyn ReId A little pocket rocket.
Here are the Top 20 sports that cause the most injuries, based on emergency room visits in the United States, along with percentage of injuries by age group for each sport:
Goals: 317 MUHAMED BESIC (M) AGE: 22 Games: 20 (12) Goals:0 18 GARETH BARRY (M) AGE: 34 Games: 82 (2) Goals: 3 19 GERARD DEULOFEU (M) AGE: 21 Games: 12 (18) Goals: 4 20 ROSS BARKLEY (M) AGE: 21 Games: 65 (31) Goals: 9
According to the 2010 report, the average number of embryos transferred per cycle was 2.0 for women younger than age 35, 2.2 for those aged 35-37, 2.6 for those aged 38-40, 3.0 for those aged 41-42, and 3.1 for those older than age 42.
Although lapse rates are generally decreasing with age, the study reports there is one exception: policies on individuals under the age of 20.
Type of participants: String, woodwind, brass and percussion instrumentalists and ensembles Age or grade level Secondary.
From measures of its activity, doctors might gauge a person's physiological age. That assessment of vitality might tell physicians how aggressively to test or treat a person's various ailments, says oncologist and cancer geneticist Norman Sharpless of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.