AIDS-related complex


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AIDS-related complex

[′ādz rə‚lād·əd ¦käm‚pleks]
(medicine)
A set of symptoms, such as lymph node enlargement, fever, loss of weight, diarrhea, and minor opportunistic diseases, associated with a weakened immune system, indicating a less severe form of infection by the HIV virus than AIDS itself. Abbreviated ARC.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Progressive lymph node histology and its prognostic value in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and AIDS-related complex. Hum Pathol.
However, growth opportunities exist for innovative proprietary medicines indicated for AIDS, AIDS-Related Complex, Alzheimer's disease, congestive heart failure, cancer and herpes simplex.
The Institute of Medicine (1986) cited a longitudinal study which compared levels of distress in homosexuals and found that those who suffered from AIDS-related complex (ARC) had greater psychological problems.
The researchers studied 913 people with AIDS, a milder ailment called AIDS-related complex, or an asymptomatic HIV infection.
The Guide to Living with HIV Infection is a book of "medical facts, practical advice, and emotional support for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and AIDS-related complex (ARC) and for [their] caregivers, families, and friends." Written by an infectious disease physician and a science writer, the book provides a readable and comprehensive resource for anyone affected by HIV infection.
The Laborers Health and Welfare Trust for Southern California, which provides insurance for several building and construction employers and their unionized workers, has a policy that excludes coverage for AIDS or AIDS-related complex unless the person is younger than 13 or became infected through a blodd transfusion.
Lack of transmission of HTLV-III/LAV infection to household contacts of patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex with oral candidiasis.
The fourth case was a reference to a letter, published in Pediatric Cardiology, in which AIDS-related complex (ARC) was reported following infant cardiac surgery.
It has been estimated that the use of AZT reduces the direct costs of treating AIDS by $1 1,000 per patient year, and reduces the costs of treating AIDS-Related Complex by $25,000 per patient year.1 The combined savings amounts to $386 million on the national level for the first year's use of AZT.
Persons who have illnesses but not AIDS are said to suffer from AIDS-Related Complex (ARC).