Anzac

(redirected from ANZACS)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Anzac

1. (in World War I) a soldier serving with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
2. (now) any Australian or New Zealand soldier
3. the Anzac landing at Gallipoli in 1915
www.anzacs.net
www.awm.gov.au
References in periodicals archive ?
ANZAC Day is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand that commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.
Meleah Hampton, currently with the Military History Section of the Australian War Memorial (AWM), presents the Battle of the Somme for 1st Anzac Corps.
It gives the reader an insight in what it was like to be an ANZAC soldier.
The day also saw the first contingent of former Pakistan Servicemen march in the ANZAC Day parades in Australia's national capital Canberra, state capitals Sydney, Brisbane, Perth, and the NSW regional city of Armidale.
In taking up the term 'field', we adhere to the Bourdieusian theme of this Special Issue and take the heritage field to be an area of social life with its own logic or rules, structured in terms of particular issues of 'stake' and power that determine how an 'event' such as Anzac memory is observed, defined and represented.
For most, Anzac Day-- Anzac stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps-- marks the landing by Australian and New Zealand soldiers in southern Turkey as part of the Gallipoli campaign of World War I.
Australians of all backgrounds are able to identify with the Anzac values, Wellings said, while few choose to identify with the country's "White Australia" past.
Every year a Dawn Services is held to commemorate the Ecanakkale Ground War during which Anzac military forces attacked to the Gallipoli on 25 April, 1915.
As Brown argued recently, the problem from an academic perspective is that the Australian government and its people are either unaware or simply ignore many of the myths that historians have uncovered about the Anzacs. Peter Stanley, for instance, pointed out that the supposedly shared positive and commendable characteristics of the Anzac soldiers is perhaps one of the biggest myths.
Here, on May 18, 1914, 42,000 Turks assembled to push the ANZACs off the ridgeline, but they were spotted gathering and the ANZACs were ready.
Nor does he try to provide a balanced coverage of the whole campaign despite the book's title--his focus is on the Australians and New Zealanders in the enclave known as Anzac. He aims 'to give readers a feel for the people of Anzac and the place'.