Cardiomyopathy

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cardiomyopathy

[¦kärd·ē·ō‚mī′äp·ə·thē]
(medicine)

Cardiomyopathy

 

(myocardosis), a term often applied to a broad group of heart diseases; specifically, noninflammatory lesions of the heart muscle (myocardium) resulting from a disturbance in myocardial metabolism. Among the causes of cardiomyopathy are nutritional disorders (alimentary dystrophy and avitaminosis, for example); protein metabolism disorders in hepatic or renal insufficiency and podagra; disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism (diabetes mellitus) and electrolyte metabolism; and endocrine disorders such as those associated with thyrotoxicosis and with hypoxia in impairment of coronary circulation, anemia, and mountain sickness. Myocardosis may also be caused by overstraining the myocardium and by exogenous poisons, such as carbon monoxide and alcohol.

In many cases the patient has no specific symptoms in the early stages; however, there may be shortness of breath and disagreeable sensations in the heart. Cardiomyopathy is manifested by dull, distant heart sounds, electrocardiographic changes, systolic murmur, extrasystole, and, more rarely, other types of arrhythmia. Severe cardiomyopathy weakens the heart contractions and may cause cardiac insufficiency. The changes associated with cardiomyopathy are usually reversible and disappear with the elimination of the underlying disease.

The cure includes treatment of the underlying disease and administration of agents that improve metabolic processes in the myocardium.

REFERENCE

Kedrov, A. A. Bolezni myshtsy serdtsa. Leningrad, 1963.

N. R. PALEEV

References in periodicals archive ?
ARVC has three phases: an early concealed phase, with an associated high rate of syncope or sudden cardiac death; an intermediate phase marked by frequent arrhythmias; and a late phase involving cardiomyopathy and heart failure.
This case demonstrates the important role of cardiac MRI in cases with suspected ARVC, as changes on ECG and echocardiography are by no means pathognomonic for this disorder.
In this report, we describe a case of ARVC in a young man who was treated at a tertiary care hospital.
According to the results of a retrospective study performed on 200 persons with sudden death, the cause has been microscopically detected as ARVC, in 10.4% of cases [16].
ARVC has been widely investigated in Boxer dogs (BASSO et al., 2004; SPIER & MEURS, 2004; MEURS et al., 2010, KAYE et al., 2015), however, little information is available regarding the autonomic status in affected animals (SPIER & MEURS, 2004).
Roche-Molina et al., "Exercise triggers ARVC phenotype in mice expressing a disease-causing mutated version of human plakophilin-2," Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol.
"An ECG will pick up 80 per cent of ARVC cases but there's still two in 10 people who it will miss," he stated.
* Frequent PVCs with LBBB morphology and an inferior axis suggest right ventricular outflow tract VT as a cause, which may be idiopathic or due to ARVC. T-wave inversion in leads V1-V3 and the presence of an Epsilon wave are further diagnostic signs of ARVC.
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The Role of endomyocardial biopsy in ARVC: looking beyond histology in search of new diagnostic markers.
In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), the dysplastic right ventricle had segmental dilatation, with regional or global systolic dysfunction, and ventricular arrhythmias.
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