ASHRAE 62.2

ASHRAE 62.2

A standard for residential mechanical ventilation systems established by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Among other requirements, the standard requires a home to have a mechanical ventilation system capable of ventilating at a rate of 1 cubic foot per minute for every 100 square feet of occupied space plus 7.5 cubic feet per minute per occupant.
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It stated: "2010 (or most current) ASHRAE 62.2 is required to be met to the fullest extent possible, when performing weatherization activity (must be implemented by Jan.
These data points are important as they directly impact the use of natural ventilation in existing standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2 (ASHRAE 2007), which defines ventilation requirements for low-rise residential buildings.
Panasonic introduces the WhisperSupply-Wall fans, designed to meet ASHRAE 62.2 requirements for makeup/supply air.
The supply and exhaust fans are assumed to have balanced flow rates equal to ASHRAE 62.2 requirements.
In particular, it has been shown that formaldehyde concentrations can exceed chronic standards in new homes meeting ASHRAE 62.2 (Offermann 2009).
The value NL = 0.3 is a reasonable default because at that leakage level the infiltration is on the order of the desired ventilation rate in ventilation standards such as ASHRAE 62.2. This will tend to slightly under-estimate the effective ventilation for very leaky homes.
The ASHRAE 62.2 minimum required mechanical ventilation rate for this house and occupancy is 63 cfm (30 L/s).
Relative Dose for Leaky House and Forced-Air Duct System for Three ASHRAE 62.2 Compliant Ventilation Systems Exhaust: No Mixing Central Fan Integrated Metric Doors Open Doors Closed Doors Open Doors Closed 1 1.06 1.64 1.16 1.36 2 0.95 1.14 1.01 1.04 3 1.05 1.59 1.06 1.18 4 3.25 10.85 2.96 7.22 5 1.88 1.04 2.04 0.90 6 1.89 4.20 1.80 3.29 7 1.77 1.43 1.83 1.40 Exhaust: Full Mixing Metric Doors Open Doors Closed 1 1.13 1.18 2 1.00 0.99 3 1.06 1.05 4 3.14 5.19 5 1.28 0.94 6 1.69 2.45 7 1.74 1.51 The first clear result is that closing the doors makes the house less mixed; all of the open door tests are about the same and are independent of the ASHRAE Standard 62.2 (ASHRAE 2007) ventilation system or distribution fan operation.
However, recent research (Price and Sherman (2006)) has shown that these days the majority of occupants do not open windows sufficiently from the point of view of satisfying ventilation requirements, such as ASHRAE 62.2. ASHRAE is in the process of publishing an addendum to ASHRAE 62.2 removing the exception allowing operable windows to meet the whole-house mechanical requirements.
While the benefit of air tightening is significant, there is a limit to the benefit if year-round mechanical ventilation is used to meet ASHRAE 62.2 requirements (ASHRAE 2004a).
Based on these measurements, it appeared that the H2 ventilation rate was consistent with ASHRAE 62.2, while the H1 was ventilated at a lower rate by design.