aura

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aura:

see spiritismspiritism
or spiritualism,
belief that the human personality continues to exist after death and can communicate with the living through the agency of a medium or psychic.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

aura

the distinctive quality of a thing, e.g. a particular work of art, and (as defined by BENJAMIN, Charles Baudelaire, 1983) also ‘a unique manifestation of distance’. Benjamins reading is dependent on a quasi-religious understanding of society. Thus social order requires certain objects in society to be popularly regarded as sacred. For example, objects like the Emerald Buddha in Thailand or Stonehenge possess an aura. They are socially distant from us in the sense of occupying the symbolic apex of culture; and they also require us to make an inner journey away from the surface preoccupations of everyday life to a posited deeper, immemorial reality. In his troubled paper on the effects of mechanical reproduction, Benjamin (Illuminations, 1955) argued that the duplication of these objects as artefacts and symbols within mass culture weakens their auratic power. They become clichéd and hackneyed. Authenticity and the sacred are lost, and the social integration of society falters. See also SIMULATION, POSTMODERNISM.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

Aura

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The aura is an emanation that surrounds all living things, especially human beings, which many believers in the Western Esoteric tradition, including the modern New Age community, claim to see and to be able to document. Many psychics, for example, claim to be able to see this emanation, completely invisible to the average person, and derive information from it, especially relative to the health of the person. Contemporary advocates of the existence of auras relate them historically to the lights said to shine around biblical and other holy figures, often pictured in Western art as halos. The aura is often said to be part of the invisible anatomy of the individual, which includes, among other invisible elements, the gchakras.

Of particular interest have been the various attempts throughout the twentieth century to scientifically document the existence of the aura and create instruments that will make it visible to everyone. Such efforts began in earnest with the work of Walter J. Kilner (1847–1920), a British physician who in 1911 published an account of his research in The Human Atmosphere. He created a dicynin screen consisting of a layer of coal-tar dye sealed between two pieces of glass. He suggested that the aura became visible after looking through the screen in bright daylight and then immediately turning to look at a person in a dimly lit room. This process made three layers of emanation. The first, a dark layer, surrounded the body for about a half an inch. The next two layers extended from the body for about three inches and a foot, respectively. He related these layers to the invisible body doubles described in Esoteric literature. Kilner’s research built upon some nineteenth-century speculations and led some colleagues to attempt to substantiate his conclusions.

Kilner’s research was largely dismissed by later researchers on light and perception, and the results he reported were seen as artifacts of the observer’s own optic process rather than reflective of any emanation being produced by the subject being observed. These findings did not prevent the marketing of Kilner goggles, advertisements for which appeared in Esoteric periodicals as late as the 1970s.

Interest in the aura was revived in the last decades of the twentieth century by the development of a new photographic technique, kirlian photography. Discovered in the 1950s by two Russian scientists, Valentina and Semyon Davidovich Kirlian, this form of photography claimed to produce photographs of an energy field around and emanating from living objects. Kirlian photographs were made by placing the object directly on a photographic plate and using a small amount of electricity rather than light to imprint the image. Kirlian pictures produced on color film proved to be both intriguing and beautiful, and for a few decades a spectrum of scientists sought to find meaning in the pictures.

Kirlian photography ultimately proved a dead end. The most intriguing pictures, reputedly the very distinct images of people produced while they claimed to be in various altered states of consciousness, were determined to be artifacts of a badly controlled process. When the pressure placed on the film was controlled, the earlier produced differences disappeared. By the end of the 1980s, interest in the process had also disappeared.

Belief in auras continues within the Esoteric community, and many psychics still claim to be able to see them. No controlled experiments that would offer support to the meaningfulness of the aura as seen by psychics exist. Among recent claims largely based upon auras as seen by psychics are those related to the existence of indigo children, special children born in the last generation whose aura has a prominent indigo component.

Sources:

Bagnall, Oscar. The Origin and Properties of the Human Aura. 1937. Reprint, New Hyde Park, NY: University Books, 1970.
Kilner, Walter J. The Human Atmosphere. London, 1911. Reprinted as The Human Aura. New Hyde Park, NY: University Books, 1965.
Krippner, Stanley, and Daniel Rubin. Galaxies of Life: The Human Aura in Acupuncture and Kirlian Photography. London: Gordon & Beach, 1973.
The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena © 2008 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Aura

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

For centuries it has been believed that certain persons, perhaps through their deep spirituality, emanate colored lights from the head ("nimbus") or even the entire body ("aureole"). In early Christian and other religious art, these lights are depicted as "halos," or "glorias," but they are more generally known as the aura. Crowns and the headdresses of priests symbolize this aura emanating from the head.

Auras are not restricted to especially holy people but can be seen by sensitives, under the right circumstances, around all living things, animate and inanimate. In the sixteenth century, Paracelsus described the aura as "The vital force (which) is not enclosed in man but radiates round him like a luminous sphere." Nandor Fodor says it is a "permanent radiation around the human body," and goes on to say that "mystics distinguish four different types of aura; the Nimbus, the Halo, the Aureola and the Glory. The first two stream from the head, the aureola from the whole body, the glory is a combination of the two. Theosophists speak of five divisions: the health aura, the vital aura, the Karmic aura, the aura of character and the aura of spiritual nature."

Although immediately obvious to sensitives, almost anyone can be trained to see and even to feel the aura. Many Witches are able to see and feel it and use the knowledge obtained in different ways. It is believed that the aura may reflect the general health of the person from whom it emanates. It can therefore be used to diagnose illness, by viewing the colors present and their relative brilliance. It is also said that colors change dependent upon mood: red for anger, lilac or purple for spirituality, pink for love, or green for deceit. Much about a person can be determined just from looking at their emanations. By projecting—either by light or simply by thought—appropriate therapeutic colors, healings can occur.

In 1858, industrial chemist Baron Karl von Reichanbach discovered radiation emanating from crystals, magnets, plants and animals. In 1911, Dr. Walter Kilner of St. Thomas' Hospital, London, devised screens through which this radiation could be seen.

The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism © 2002 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Aura

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)
see also odic force

According to metaphysics, the human body is composed of seven distinct elements. The first three—solid, liquid, and gas—form the physical body. The fourth is the etheric body and interpenetrates the physical body. Then there is the astral body, the mental body, and finally the spiritual body. The last two are virtually impossible to see because they vibrate at rates too high for normal detection by the physical eye, but the others can be seen by sensitives. These energy patterns are termed the aura.

The etheric body, or inner aura, extends slightly beyond the physical, appearing to the adept as a thin, dark line no more than an inch thick. Beyond it extends the astral body, which may be several inches in thickness. The aura extends around the whole body, but is most easily seen around the head, where it is termed the nimbus. The aura around the whole body is the aureola. The nimbus is what is shown in Christian art—especially from the fifth to the sixteenth centuries—as “halos” or “glorias.” In paintings of Moslem prophets, the aura is often shown as a ring of flames. Crowns and priests’ headdresses symbolize the aura. Some art of Ceylon, Mexico, Peru, and of Japanese Buddhism show light extending around the whole body of a holy person. Paracelsus, in the sixteenth century, said “The vital force is not enclosed in Man, but radiates round him like a luminous sphere.”

The aura changes color with the person’s health, mood, etc., and so can be used by the sensitive as an instrument of divination. A person with a blue or lavender aura, for example, will be in a deeply spiritual state. Love shows as a pink aura, and anger as a vibrant red. Vortexes and holes in the aura or the aureola may indicate health problems and a need for attention. Seeing a change of color, for example from dark pink to vibrant red, would indicate that the person’s anger was increasing and could explode in the near future.

Sources:

Buckland, Raymond: Color Magic—Unleash Your Inner Powers. St. Paul: Llewellyn, 2002
Butler, William E.: How to Read the Aura. New York: Samuel Weiser, 1971
Cayce, Edgar: Auras. Virginia Beach: ARE Press, 1973
Spence, Lewis: An Encyclopedia of the Occult. London: George Routledge & Sons, 1920
Autography see Writing, Slate
Automatic Art see Art, Automatic
Automatic Writing see Writing, Automatic
The Spirit Book © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

aura

[′ȯr·ə]
(medicine)
An unusual sensation preceding the appearance of more definite symptoms; in epilepsy, auras frequently precede the convulsive seizure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Aura

goddess of breezes. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 42]
See: Wind
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

aura

1. Pathol strange sensations, such as noises in the ears or flashes of light, that immediately precede an attack, esp of epilepsy
2. (in parapsychology) an invisible emanation produced by and surrounding a person or object: alleged to be discernible by individuals of supernormal sensibility
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
After a review of its clinical pipeline priorities in 2016, Lilly sold the compound to TVM Capital Life Science, which then established AurKa as part of the TVM Life Science Ventures VII fund.
AURKA is located on chromosome 20q13, frequently amplified and overexpressed in human malignancies, involving breast cancer [17], pancreatic cancer [18], and gastric cancer [19].
The 2.4 kb transcript from AURKA gene encodes a protein of 403 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 45.8 kDa (Figure 1).
Interestingly, PLK1 downregulation resulted in downregulation of AURKA, MDM2, CHUK, and CDK1 which are known to be positive regulators of PLK1 whereas PKMYT, which is a negative regulator of PLK1, was upregulated in PLK1 downregulated therapy-resistant MCL cells suggesting their association with PLK1 downregulation.
Alisertib (MLN8237), a selective AURKA inhibitor, induced a treatment response in six out of 35 patients (17%) with relapsed/refractory AML, while 49% achieved stable disease.[sup][36] Both AZD1152 (barasertib) and ZM447439, selective AURKB inhibitors, showed apoptosis-inducing effects in preclinical research.[sup][37] In a 2013 Phase I study, barasertib, used in combination with low-dose chemotherapy, demonstrated a therapeutic benefit in patients aged ≥60 years.[sup][38] The positive effects of barasertib were also demonstrated in advanced AML[sup][39] and newly diagnosed, relapsed, or refractory AML.[sup][40]
Anderson Cancer Center applied a functional genomics strategy and identified the protein kinase Aurora A (Aurka) as an essential component of ESC function.
Aurora kinases A and B (AURKA and AURKB) are serine/threonine kinases that play an important role in chromosome alignment, segregation, and cytokinesis during mitosis.
They found a gene called AURKA responsible for the growth of deadly MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells.
(a) Common Sequence ID Official gene gene name symbol BAG1 NM_004323 BAG1 Bcl2 NM_000633 BCL2 CCNB1 NM_031966 CCNB1 CD68 NM_001251 CD68 CEGP1 NM_020974 SCUBE2 CTSL2 NM_001333 CTSL2 EstR1 NM_000125 ESR1 GRB7 NM_005310 GRB7 GSTM1 NM_000561 GSTM1 HER2 NM_004448 ERBB2 Ki-67 NM_002417 MKI67 MYBL2 NM_002466 MYBL2 PR NM_000926 PGR STK15 NM_003600 AURKA STMY3 NM_005940 MMP11 SURV NM_001168 BIRC5 -Actin NM_001101 ACTB GAPDH NM_002046 GAPDH GUS NM_000181 GUSB RPLPO NM_001002 RPLP0 TFRC NM_003234 TFRC (a) Genes annotated with NCBI LocusLink sequence identification numbers and official gene symbols of the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/nomenclature/searchgenes.pl).
'Main KhayaalHoon Kisi AurKa' is written by Shabana Ghulam Nabi and directed by Emraan Kaleem Mallick, and promised to be a soft romantic-drama which emphasizes on the sacrifice of love, a broken relationship.
Song et al., "AURKA induces EMT by regulating histone modification through Wnt/[beta]-catenin and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in gastric cancer," Oncotarget, vol.