awn

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awn

any of the bristles growing from the spikelets of certain grasses, including cereals

awn

[ȯn]
(botany)
Any of the bristles at the ends of glumes or bracts on the spikelets of oats, barley, and some wheat and grasses. Also known as beard.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sharp ends of the awn allow them to penetrate the skin of your dog, become lodged in ears, as well as the possibility of being inhaled through the nose, or ingested, as your dog runs through thick cover.
The real purpose of the awns is to help the seeds work their way into the soil, where they bury themselves and wait for winter rainfall to germinate and start the cycle again.
In detail, from upper respiratory tract, grass awns were extracted from 24/41 patients for a total number of 25 awns (Figure 1 and Table 1).
X-rays revealed the culprit: Her lungs had been invaded by a grass awn, a tiny, nefarious agent of pain.
Megress-1 spike grain yield responded more to leaf ablation (-25.8%), Bousselam spike grain yield to awns ablation (-24.2%), while spike grain yield of MBB/Ofanto, Essalem and Megress-3 showed high decline caused by spike shading (-42.3, -48.7 and -41.5%, respectively).
For awn length, positive value of GCA is required because maximum awn length contributes towards maximum light reflectance.
The awn characteristic was quantified as the percentage of seeds with an awn in a random sample of 50 seeds from a plant and expressed as the mean of three samples.
Locating the troublesome awn is akin to finding that proverbial needle in a haystack.
Nevertheless, these results demonstrate a slight advantage of leaf rust resistance and awns for kernel size that is consistent with trends in kernel weight (Table 2).
Checking the chest, underbelly, and flank for cuts, grass awns or punctures.
They differ from each other in that NO753-2 produces plants with two lemma awns on most spikelets while NO753-2A produces plants with three or four lemma awns on most spikelets.
The 2013 National Amateur champion English springer spaniel is another grass awn infection survivor.