Abbott and Costello


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Abbott and Costello

(kŏstĕl`ō), American comedy team of William Alexander "Bud" Abbott, 1895–1974, b. Asbury Park, N.J., and Lou Costello, 1906–59, b. Paterson, N.J., as Louis Francis Cristillo. From 1931 to 1957 the tall, elegant Abbott played "straight man" to the short, roly-poly Costello in various stage, film, radio, and television routines. Extremely popular in the 1940s, they were well known for their series of successful movies including Buck Privates (1941) and Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948). The duo was also famous for their "Who's on first?" skit.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heirs and successors of Abbott and Costello sued for copyright infringement.
THE EXTRAS: The 13-disc box set contains 24 feature films plus the documentary The World of Abbott and Costello.
At its worst, it's the legal equivalent of Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First," which can seriously impede the insurer's ability to bring the litigation to a successful resolution.
Q CAN you tell me the name of this Abbott and Costello film?
Offering biographies, entertaining anecdotes, and interviews, he showcases 21 talents including Maria Ouspenskaya (The Wolf Man, 1941); Virginia Christine (The Mummy's Curse, 1944); and Lenore Aubert (Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, 1948).
He was frequently cast as a thug, appearing in films including "Abbott and Costello in the Foreign Legion" and "The Ten Commandments," and in TV shows such as "Dragnet," "Perry Mason" and "Gunsmoke."
World War II was an occasion not only for solemn unity of purpose but for stupid comedies like Abbott and Costello's Buck Privates and Hal Roach's The Devil With Hitler, a two-reeler so bad it should have been deployed as a terror weapon itself.
His writing credits include Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein and the television show Alfred Hitchcock Presents.
His name was removed from the credits of films, which had included scripts for the old vaudevillians Abbott and Costello, who were for a spell in the 1940s the hottest property in Hollywood.
Abbott and Costello features, on the other hand, earn only the comic relief role for American Movie Classics or Turner Classic Movies.
It somehow felt right that England's D-Day encounter with the Argies was in the hands of John Motson and Trevor Brooking, a double act as maligned as Abbott and Costello but perfect for the occasion.