rectus abdominis

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rectus abdominis

[′rek·təs ab′däm·ə·nəs]
(anatomy)
The long flat muscle of the anterior abdominal wall which, as vertical fibers, arises from the pubic crest and symphysis, and is inserted into the cartilages of the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs.
References in periodicals archive ?
1,2] Biomechanical studies have shown that the abdominal muscles play a significant role in the stabilization of the spine.
Flow and volume records reflect expiratory and inspiratory effects that were greater for stimulation of the upper-thorax than for abdominal muscles.
Lift heavy objects by getting as close to the object as possible, bending your knees, engaging your abdominal muscles, and keeping your back as straight as possible.
This hypothesis requires further study; however, the consistent methods used by the latter studies [5,7,8] might suggest that different abdominal muscles display far more complex responses to training than was previously thought.
These early vertebrates prove to have a well-developed neck musculature as well as powerful abdominal muscles - not unlike some human equivalents displayed on the beaches of the world every summer.
Tighten your abdominal muscles and squeeze your buttocks.
The abdominal muscles were sutured by lockstitch pattern using chromic catgut followed by skin sutures by silk (Fig.
Standing - tuck your chin in to elongate the neck, pull your shoulders down and back, tighten your abdominal muscles while pulling your belly into your backbone, tighten your pelvic floor, keep knees soft, and increase the arch in your foot.
Evaluating the ability to rectify and maintain lumbar adjustment can help to explain the behavior of abdominal muscles and their participation in stabilizing the pelvic muscles in dancers during posterior pelvic tilt and double straight leg lowering tests.
Although toned abdominal muscles may look attractive, these core muscles actually serve a very important role in helping to "stabilize" the back.
You need to work on your abdominal muscles that lie deep inside," explains Kiran Sawhney, owner, Fitnesolution.