Abed-nego

Abed-nego

(əbĕd`nēgō), in the Book of DanielDaniel,
book of the Bible. It combines "court" tales, perhaps originating from the 6th cent. B.C., and a series of apocalyptic visions arising from the time of the Maccabean emergency (167–164 B.C.
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, one of the Three Young MenThree Young Men,
in the Book of Daniel, the three men cast by Nebuchadnezzar into the fiery furnace and delivered by an angel. Their names are Abed-nego, Shadrach, and Meshach, in Babylonian; Azariah, Hananiah, and Mishael, in Hebrew; and Azarias, Ananias, and Misael, in Greek.
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, educated with Daniel in the court of Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. With his three companions, Abed-nego was thrown into the furnace.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Like Daniel they receive new, foreign names, Shadrach, Meshach and Abed-nego (Dan.
"'And without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.' (Hebrews 11:5-7, NASB) Through faith in God David destroyed Goliath against all odds, Shadrach, Meshach and Abed-nego were protected in the fiery furnace, Daniel was not eaten by the lions, Gideon was victorious, the sick were healed, the lame walked, the blind could see and the dead was raised.
The second time this punishment is imposed is in Dan 3:29 where Nebuchadnezzar warns that anyone that dishonors the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego "will be dismembered and his house will be reduced to rubble."
Each of the play's three acts corresponds roughly to one of the play's principle characters, Abed-nego, Shadrach, and Meshach, in that order.
If we understand that Shadrach's use of language is informed by, or represents, a literal impulse, the attributes of language associated with Abed-nego and Meshach may also be simplified or conceptualized.
With this line in Abed-nego's opening monologue in act one, Carter introduces the theme of justice alongside the theme of language.
Abed-nego's first monologue is a relatively straightforward account of an event, relatively straightforward in relation to his later monologues and to those of the other characters.
At one point, in response to Abed-nego's reading directly from the "Good Book," Danielle says, "Objection.
Abed-nego embodies a movement toward the representation or the words themselves.
We have noted that Abed-nego, Shadrach, and Meshach all have a specious claim to possess justice, each for his own reason.
We see Abed-nego succumb to an Eve complex, and the temptations of a child who is not fertile.