Perseus cluster

(redirected from Abell 426)

Perseus cluster

(Abell 426) A rich cluster of galaxies lying about 70 megaparsecs away in the direction of the constellation Perseus. It is the brightest cluster observed in the X-ray waveband. It also contains several strong radio sources, three of which have been identified with the galaxies IC 310, NGC 1265, and NGC 1275. The most intense radio source (3C84A or Perseus A) is associated with the dominant cD galaxy, NGC 1275. This lies at the center of the cluster's cooling flow, which has a mass deposition rate of around 200 solar masses a year (see clusters of galaxies). NGC 1275 shows nuclear continuum activity (it was originally classified as a Seyfert galaxy) and is surrounded by a particularly extensive (up to 40 kiloparsecs in radius) nebula of line-emitting filaments. HST images show it is also surrounded by many globular clusters. Study of the galaxy is complicated by the presence of an intervening disk galaxy, with its own emission-line spectrum, that is falling toward NGC 1275 along the line of sight at 3000 km s–1.

Perseus cluster

[′pər·sē·əs ‚kləs·tər]
(astronomy)
An irregular, diffuse cluster of galaxies centered on the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275, with redshift z = 0.018
References in periodicals archive ?
57), since Abell 426 dominates my observing at the moment.
The Perseus Cluster (Abell 426) is a cluster of galaxies in the constellation Perseus.
Now we'll move on to the Perseus Cluster (Abell 426), a collection of thousands of galaxies centered 230 million light-years away from us and 2.3[degrees] east-northeast of Algol on the sky.
Abell 426's jets produce the gas vibrations associated with a deep note.
The deepest note in space yet identified belongs to the galaxy cluster Abell 426, often nicknamed the Perseus Cluster because of its location in that constellation.
Although we can never directly hear Abell 426's tune, we can see the pressure waves it generates.
In 2002 Andrew Fabian (University of Cambridge, U.K.) used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make a detailed image of the X-rays produced by Abell 426's hot gas.
This celestial filament stretches from the Perseus Galaxy Cluster (Abell 426) through the rich clusters Abell 347 and Abell 262 in Andromeda on toward the NGC 507 and NGC 383 galaxy groups in northern Pisces.
For the final leg of this journey, follow a trail of faint galaxies 10' due east past the bright open cluster M34 and brilliant Algol to the Perseus Galaxy Cluster, Abell 426. Its central region is a 40' string of galaxies running northeast from IC 310 to NGC 1281.
Abell 426 is ruled by its brightest member, the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275, also known as Perseus A.
Mag.(V) NGC 383 [1.sup.h][07.4.sup.m] +32[degrees] 25' 12.4 NGC 507 [1.sup.h][23.7.sup.m] +33[degrees] 15' 11.2 NGC 536 [1.sup.h][26.4.sup.m] +34[degrees] 42' 12.4 NGC 708 [1.sup.h][52.8.sup.m] +36[degrees] 09' 12.7 NGC 911 [2.sup.h][25.7.sup.m] +41[degrees] 57' 12.7 NGC 1275 [3.sup.h][19.8.sup.m] +41[degrees] 31' 11.9 Atlas chart number Name Uranometria Millennium Member of NGC 383 91 147 Pisces Group NGC 507 91 125 NGC 536 91 125 HCG 10 NGC 708 92 123 Abell 262 NGC 911 62 100 Abell 347 NGC 1275 62 98 Abell 426 STEVE GOTTLIEB is a regular Deep-Sky Notebook contributor.
Many large-telescope users are familiar with the rich northern clusters Abell 426 in Perseus, Abell 1367 in Leo, and Abell 1656 in Coma Berenices (which can be found at, respectively, right ascension 3h 20m, declination +41.5[degree sign]; 11h 44m, +20.0[degree sign]; and 13h 00m, +28.0[degree sign]).