abeyance


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

abeyance

Law an indeterminate state of ownership, as when the person entitled to an estate has not been ascertained
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
(when the animal spirits seemed utterly in abeyance) to that species of energetic concision--that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation--that leaden, self- balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance, which may be observed in the lost drunkard, or the irreclaimable eater of opium, during the periods of his most intense excitement.
I repeat that the leading principle of embalmment consisted, with us, in the immediately arresting, and holding in perpetual abeyance, all the animal functions subjected to the process.
While these affairs were in abeyance, our visit to Mr.
The divorce is now 'in abeyance' after the Labour Party were handed papers relating to Martin's Brussels office expenditure.
What Paul Morrison managed, though, was to hold in abeyance any sense that this darkness was unremitting.
The answer to the second question must be held in abeyance and will depend on how the first question is dealt with by Anglicans in Canada and worldwide.
(Note: At a recent status hearing in the BNA-IRS lawsuit, the court asked whether TEI supported the government's motion to hold a disclosure order in abeyance until the legislative process was completed; our counsel, who attended at the Justice Department's request, emphatically answered yes.)
Today, if an owner tries to go directly to Federal Court, it will hold the case in abeyance - under the abstention doctrine - while the State Court hears the matter, saying in effect "if you are still unhappy, come back tO US."
Patrick Daly, president of the provincial Catholic trustees' association, stated: "We don't believe that holding in abeyance our right to tax will affect negatively the Catholic nature of our schools."
Thus, it would be reasonable for the Service to delay action on such a 'protective' claim until after the pending litigation [or legislative/regulatory change or examination] was resolved." When there is a substantial possibility that the pending litigation will resolve whether the taxpayer is entitled to a refund, the GCM states there is "no reason why action on the claim should not be delayed as long as reasonably possible" and that "such a 'protective' claim may be held in abeyance until the pending litigation is resolved." If, instead of delaying action, the IRS simply disallowed the protective claim, the taxpayer might be forced to file a refund suit because the two-year statute of limitations for doing so runs from the date the claim is disallowed (Sec.
While waiting for the Office of the Ombudsman to resolve his motion for reconsideration, former Nueva Ecija Governor Aurelio Umali is asking the Sandiganbayan to hold in abeyance the determination of probable cause and to suspend the proceedings in his case.
Article 6 of the Constitution says: 'Any person who abrogates or subverts or suspends or hold in abeyance, or attempts or conspires to abrogate or subvert or suspend or hold in abeyance the Constitution by use of force or show force or by any other unconstitutional means shall be guilty of high treason.