balsam fir

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balsam fir,

common name for the evergreen tree Abies balsamea of NE North American boreal forests. It has small needles and cones and is used for lumber. It is also called Canada balsamCanada balsam,
yellow, oily, resinous exudation obtained from the balsam fir. It is an oleoresin (see resin) with a pleasant odor but a biting taste. It is a turpentine rather than a true balsam.
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, as is the resin it produces, which is used as an adhesive in optical lenses and glass slides. Balsam fir is classified in the division PinophytaPinophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called gymnosperms. The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Pinopsida, order Coniferales, family Pinaceae.

balsam fir

A softwood tree with coarse-grained wood, used for interior trim. See also: Wood
References in periodicals archive ?
It passes through a green world of sphagnum moss, ferns, pitcher plants, mountain holly and trees adapted to the wet environment: black spruce (Picea mariana), tamarack (Larix laricina), Northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea).
but also with other angiosperm (e.g., Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and gymnosperm [e.g., Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] tree species (Rowe 1972).
The rearing jars used in this experiment had been lined with paper towels made from stone ground wood pulp from North American-grown balsam fir (Abies balsamea).
In general, species contributing the greatest number of twigs in adjacent woods were balsam fir (Abies balsamea), beaked hazelnut (Corylus cornuta), and striped maple (Acer spicatum).
Of course, identical trees at the local landscape nursery are labeled "silver pine." And when your uncle, the retired professor of botany, came for a visit, he said that beyond a shadow of a doubt those were "Abies balsamea." Your kids call them "Christmas trees."