Foster, Abigail Kelley

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Foster, Abigail Kelley,

1810–87, American abolitionist and advocate of women's rights, b. near Amherst, Mass. Abby Kelley, as she was known to her contemporaries, began her crusade against slavery in 1837 after teaching in several Quaker schools. In 1845 she married Stephen S. Foster, a radical abolitionist and reformer. As one of the first female lecturers before sexually mixed audiences, she was often greeted by listeners with extreme hostility. After suffering a great deal of abuse, even from fellow abolitionists, she began to devote more of her efforts toward women's rights. During the last 30 years of her active life, she was prominent as a suffragist.

Foster, Abigail Kelley

See Kelley, Abby.
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Stories and folklore from the African oral tradition will be performed by Andre Keitt in Keys to the Keepers, and visitors can meet historians portraying Abolitionists Abigail Kelley Foster and William Lloyd Garrison.
Like most of Cumbler's subjects--including radical preachers Theodore Parker and Thomas Wentworth Higginson, female abolitionists Abigail Kelley and Elizabeth Buf-fum Chace, and the truly unheralded likes of Marie Zakrzewski and Franklin Sanbor--Bowditch and Howe occupied the second tier of radical New England abolitionists.