abolition

(redirected from Abolition movement)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to Abolition movement: abolitionism, abolitionist

abolition

History
1. (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
2. (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
References in periodicals archive ?
A secondary intent of the church's very public support of the nuclear abolition movement, Powers says, is to rally the world's Catholics around the issue.
Likewise, he presents what in many respects is the classic narrative of the abolition movement but encompasses a broader understanding of emancipation by significantly incorporating the influence of African American actions into that narrative.
Black History walks take participants on a historical journey through Glasgow's mercantile past and examine the city's connections with tobacco, slavery and the abolition movement.
But I most anticipate reading Manisha Sinha's The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition (Yale University Press) to learn of the African American role in shaping the abolition movement and to "hear" voices once lost in history's silences.
His support of the abolition movement very likely cost him the presidential election on four occasions.
The documents trace the evolution from feminist comparisons between women's subordination and slaves' lives to the emergence of the abolition movement, the first political movement to bring together women from different nationalities and races.
In the days and quite possibly years ahead, the abolition movement in Mauritania may very well be without its iconic leaders or much of any global visibility.
(He described the abolition movement as "weak, powerless and soon to be forgotten'' and referred to white men from the South as "the chivalrous race.'') Buchanan roomed with William King of Alabama during their Senate days, and the pair were so close that people referred to them as "Siamese twins.'' King went on to become the only bachelor vice president, under Franklin Pierce.
This has put Lebanon in the crosshairs of the International Commission against the Death Penalty, which paid a visit to promote the abolition movement earlier this month.
She counters that the movement shared "greater affinity with radical movements for social change like women's rights, communitarian, and utopian socialist movements than with Bible societies." Conventional and revisionist historical accounts incorrectly overemphasize this link to "narrow religious concerns" (105) she argues, concluding her historical defense of the abolitionists' merits by noting: "Viewed from a world historical perspective, the legacy of the abolition movement has hardly been one of intolerance and war" (108).
Subject matter that unsurprisingly receive a lot of attention include the institution of slavery and the abolition movement, temperance, women's rights, education, politics, emancipation, racism, suffrage, and historical personalities, namely John Brown, William Lloyd Garrison, and Abraham Lincoln.
By the 1850s, Emerson's work seemed anticlimactic compared to the essays of his younger years; perhaps surprisingly, his older works grew more popular even as Emerson diverted his attention from those ideas to focus on the abolition movement.