abrasion

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Related to Abrasions: concussion

abrasion

Geography the effect of mechanical erosion of rock, esp a river bed, by rock fragments scratching and scraping it; wearing down

abrasion

[ə′brā·zhən]
(engineering)
The removal of surface material from any solid through the frictional action of another solid, a liquid, or a gas or combination thereof.
A surface discontinuity brought about by roughening or scratching.
(geology)
Wearing away of sedimentary rock chiefly by currents of water laden with sand and other rock debris and by glaciers.
(medicine)
A spot denuded of skin, mucous membrane, or superficial epithelium by rubbing or scraping.

abrasion

A surface discontinuity caused by roughening or scratching.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this study was to explore the frequency and severity of dental abrasion related tooth surface loss and its association with tooth brushing behaviors in residents of Karachi, visiting Bahria University Dental Hospital.
From a distance, gunshots produce a round or elliptical perforation with an abrasion collar (the gyrating bullet abrades the inverted skin).
Moreno Menghini and colleagues showed no differences in healing of traumatic corneal abrasions between groups who received an eye patch, a contact lens, or no eye covering.
To investigate quality of aggregate, physical characterization and Los Angeles Abrasion Tests were performed on 15 samples collected from Murree Formation of Miocene age.
When a child has a red eye, it can be hard to tell the difference between a scratch on the eye (abrasion) and an infection like pink eye.
In the Italian Amateurs League, over 1 600 male players aged between 15 and 35 years reported concerns about the risk of abrasion in sliding tackles.[8] In terms of abrasions, players' role in the team (goalkeeper, defender, midfielder and forward) influenced their perception, with defenders and midfielders scoring the surface worse for abrasions than goalkeepers and forwards.
Due to the self-regenerating nature of corneal epithelial cells, corneal abrasions generally resolve quickly with limited treatment.
Injury treatment includes abrasions, animal bites, minor burns, minor cut closure (with skin adhesive), splinter removal, joint sprains and strains, and staple or suture removal.
The Study: During their well-child visits, 96 healthy infants one-to-twelve weeks old were examined for corneal abrasions. Information was compiled on each infant, including fingernail trimming practices and sleeping and crying patterns in the previous 24 hours.
"These abrasions were usually left uncovered, and when combined with frequent skin-to-skin contact throughout the football season, probably constituted both the source and the vehicle for transmission," wrote researcher Sophia V.