abstract machine

(redirected from Abstract computer)

abstract machine

(language)
A processor design which is not intended to be implemented as hardware, but which is the notional executor of a particular intermediate language (abstract machine language) used in a compiler or interpreter. An abstract machine has an instruction set, a register set and a model of memory. It may provide instructions which are closer to the language being compiled than any physical computer or it may be used to make the language implementation easier to port to other platforms.

A virtual machine is an abstract machine for which an interpreter exists.

Examples: ABC, Abstract Machine Notation, ALF, CAML, F-code, FP/M, Hermes, LOWL, Christmas, SDL, S-K reduction machine, SECD, Tbl, Tcode, TL0, WAM.

abstract machine

(theory)
A procedure for executing a set of instructions in some formal language, possibly also taking in input data and producing output. Such abstract machines are not intended to be constructed as hardware but are used in thought experiments about computability.

Examples: Finite State Machine, Turing Machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
NET Programming Fundamentals, by Souleiman Valiev, is a training course for beginners dealing with the complexities of abstract computer programming concepts by presenting them in a clear and simple format www.
Its goal is to help the girls learn both concrete computer skills and abstract computer science concepts 'in a positive and encouraging environment.
Experts at the London Institute of Neurology showed volunteers abstract computer images while wafting the smell of ice cream or peanut butter.
With Japan in its worst recession since World War Two and bankruptcies claiming more companies all the time, spending money to deal with an abstract computer problem more than a year down the road is not very attractive.
His early works range from abstract computer animation to luminous combinations of animation styles to arresting hybrids of live action and animation.
Freedman, with more than 35 years of experience in the field, is internationally known for making abstract computer concepts understandable for non-technical people, according to the publisher.