Abulcasis

Abulcasis

(ä`bo͞olkä`sĭs) or

Abu Khasim

(ä`bo͞o kä`sĭm), Arab physician, d. c.1013, b. near Córdoba, Spain. His chief work, a detailed account of surgery and medicine, was for many years the leading surgical textbook. Known as the Tasrif [the collection], it consisted of three parts, dealing with cautery, with surgery, and with fractures and dislocations. It was translated many times into Latin and into other languages. His name also appears as Albucasis.
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Intervenant a l'ouverture d'un colloque international, organise sous le theme [beaucoup moins que]Diabetes Morocco 2018[beaucoup plus grand que] par la Ligue Marocaine de Lutte contre le Diabete, en collaboration avec l'Universite Internationale Abulcasis des Sciences de la Sante de Rabat, Doukkali a appele a sensibiliser davantage la population sur l'importance d'adopter un mode de vie sain base sur une alimentation equilibree et une activite physique reguliere.
(2) Genetics Center of the Cheikh Zayed Foundation, Abulcasis International University of Health Sciences, Rabat, Morocco
The first recorded reference to the involvement of the extracranial vasculature in headache is attributed to Abu Qasim al-Zahrawi (AD 936--1013), the renowned Moorish physician (known in the West as Abucalsis or Abulcasis).
The most notable ancient medical descriptions are texts from Egypt (Imhotep, Edwin Smith Papyrus, Ebers Papyrus, Kahun Gynecological Papyrus), Mesopotamia (Diagnostic Handbook, Alkindus, De Gradibus), India (Ayurveda, Sushruta Samhita, Charaka Samhita), China (Yellow Emperor, Huangdi Neijing), Greece (Iliad and Odyssey are the earliest sources of Greek medical practice; Hippocratic medicine), Persia (Rhazes, Avicenna, The Canon of Medicine, The Book of Healing), Spain (Abulcasis, Kitab al-Tasrif) and Syria (Ibn al-Nafis, Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon, Comprehensive Book on Medicine).
907 with Mesue, Grabadin, edited by Johannes Theobaldus and Marcus de Papia; Abulcasis, Liber servitoris de praeparatione medicinarum simplicium, translated by Abraham Tortuosiensis and edited by Simon a Cordo ([Strasbourg: Johann Priiss, about 1483-1484]).
Al-Zahrawi (known in the Western Hemisphere as Abulcasis) lived from 930 to 1013 A.D.
"Al-Tasrif" included descriptions and illustrations of more than 200 surgical instruments, many of which Abulcasis created himself (i.e., scalpels, curettes, retractors, rods, specula and the surgical needle).
Surgical instruments have come a long way since the time of Abulcasis. Surgical instrumentation executives agree that the long-term viability of this sector depends on lowering manufacturing costs and making simpler surgical instruments that offer less risk.