Acadians


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Acadians

America’s lost tribe; suffered expulsion under British. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 2; Am. Lit.: “Evangeline” in Hart, 263]
References in periodicals archive ?
Our Lady of the Assumption Cathedral is the physical manifestation of decades of efforts by Acadians to win recognition for their presence, demographic importance, and legitimate rights as full citizens.
In response to the court decision on April 28, 2017, an Order in Council (OIC 2017-158) was issued establishing a commission to inquire into certain matters concerning effective electoral representation for Acadian and African Nova Scotians in Nova Scotia.
Its snapshot of the human suffering occasioned by the 1755 expulsion of the Acadians, and its appeal to Victorian readers to pay attention to the increasingly disenfranchised state of Indigenous peoples, make the novel a valuable contribution to early Canadian fiction.
In this case, the adoption and institutionalization of the linguistic regime in New Brunswick has had a profound effect on Acadians. It has given their language political--much more than social--recognition, and has redistributed vast resources to their institutions, especially their schools.
With a population of 240,455 mother tongue French speakers in 2011, Acadians represent 32.5% of the New Brunswick population, down from 33.8% (214,720) in 1971 (Statistics Canada 2011).
The fact that so many of these families were represented in the ledgers by one or more members of the household, as well as across generations, clearly suggests that there was a strong tie between the Acadians and PRC.
Hodson's focus is on how exiled Acadians found a place in "the labor market undergirding the eighteenth-century Atlantic world" and in particular how France's empire builders exploited them as an alternative to African slaves and recalcitrant peasants (120).
In the 1671 census there were 380 Acadians in what is now southern Nova Scotia.
The Acadian Diaspora: An Eighteenth-Century History, by Christopher Hodson, New York, Oxford University Press, 2012, xii, 260 pp.
Some Acadians dissented from the continuing focus on the tragedy of 1755 by self-proclaimed Acadian leaders.
Ubicada en el centro sur del estado de Louisiana, es hogar de la cuenca de agua dulce mas grande del mundo, la Atchafalaya (es obligado el viaje en 'air boat' por el pantano), que albergan cocodrilos, castores, nutrias y fauna exotica, una zona rica en tradicion historica ya que su origen se remonta a los inmigrantes franceses --los "acadian"-- que decidieron hacer del lugar su residencia permanente.
Chief Justice Belcher ruled as to the legality of the deportation of the Acadians in a decision that was read at the Council meeting in Halifax, at which the Lieutenant Governor was present.