açaí

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açaí

(ä'säē`), tree, Euterpe oleracea, of the family Arecaceae (palmpalm,
common name for members of the Palmae, a large family of chiefly tropical trees, shrubs, and vines. Most species are treelike, characterized by a crown of compound leaves, called fronds, terminating a tall, woody, unbranched stem.
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 family) and its fruit, grown chiefly in Pará state in the Amazon region of Brazil. The trees can grow to 60 ft (18 m). the small, round, dark purple fruits are typically 1-2 in. (1.3 cm) in diameter. Initially collected from the wild, açaí is now cultivated on plantations; the tree and other trees in the genus Euterpe are also grown for hearts of palm. The pulp of the açaí fruit, botanically a drupe, or stone fruit, is often sweetened and frozen. An important part of the local diet for centuries, it has since 2000 enjoyed growing popularity as a dietary supplement. Although studies have shown that the fruit is a source of antioxidants, claims about specific health benefits are unproven.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The global Acai Berry Extract market is on the verge of accumulating steady revenue over the forecast period, according to the latest report on Wise Guy Research (WGR).
With the Rico's Acai deal, the retail space at The Village at Robinson Farm is now fully leased.
With this knowledge at hand, the Salimbangons found a way to transform the "super fruit" acai berry into a purple-colored all-natural juice with a delicious chocolate berry taste without any preservatives.
Additionally, acai berry pulp has been shown to reduce blood sugar, insulin and blood cholesterol levels in overweight adults who consumed 200 grams per day for one month.
Hence, the highest concentration of the acai fruit that was safe and effective in the rabbit model was 25%.
Blended with pracaxi oil, acai extract and castor oil, this gel, according to Price, doesn't leave behind flakes or residue and can easily be reactivated by lightly spritzing water on hair to restyle.
The acai pulp is extracted from the eatable part of the acai palm fruit, using water and depulper; it must be preserved with physical processes (pasteurization) and addition of citric acid; the use of chemical preservatives or colorings is prohibited, excepting the colouring obtained from the acai fruit itself (BRAZIL, 2000).
Despite its evident economic potential, the production of acai fruits comes mainly from the extractive exploitation of native trees, which naturally occur in Amazonian lowlands (Homma et al., 2006).
Acai berry ABC recommended to take one capsule/time (before breakfast with 350-500 ml water)/day.
Although highly appreciated in Brazil and even worldwide, the commercialization of the acai fruit is still limited since it is a highly perishable fruit and processing is essential to preserve its bioactive compounds (Del Pozo-Insfran et al., 2004; Gallori, Bilia, Bergonzi, Barbosa, & Vincieri, 2004; Coisson, Travaglia, Piana, Capasso, & Arlorio, 2005).
Acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), a fruit native to the Amazon region, has gained international attention as a functional food owing to its high content of polyphenols and potential health benefits.