Acanthaster

Acanthaster

[ə‚kan′thas·tər]
(invertebrate zoology)
A genus of Indo-Pacific starfishes, including the crown-of-thorns, of the family Asteriidae; economically important as a destroyer of oysters in fisheries.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings, published in the journal BMC Biology, could play an important role in controlling the feeding behavior of the crown of thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci), which feeds on coral and is having a devastating impact on the Australian Great Barrier Reef.
In echinoderms, light flashes directed at optical cushion photoreceptors of the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) elicit voltage changes (Petie et al., 2016).
The starfish, scientific name Acanthaster planci, is a venomous coral-eating starfish that threatens corals, which are living organisms that take years and centuries to rehabilitate.
Sea stars (Acanthaster spp.) are coral predators and when an MPA becomes rich in corals, they move into them from nearby coral-poor areas to find easy prey.
| WHAT type of creature is the crown-of-thorns, acanthaster planci?
Major genetic differences between crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) in the Indian and Pacific oceans.
Investigation of the anti-cancer potential of Acanthaster planci starfish extract along with Tamoxifen (a non-steroidal selective estrogen receptor modulator) in human breast cancer cells indicated that the sea star extract compared with Tamoxifen ([IC.sub.50]=15.6 [micro]g/ml) was more efficient in the early arrest of cell growth and recruitment of the apoptosis process (25).
The topics are pair formation in coral reef fishes: an ecological perspectives; the ecosystem roles of parrotfishes on tropical reefs; limits to understanding and managing outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster spp.); the ecology of ghost crabs; citizen scientists and marine research: volunteer participants, their contributions, and projection for the future; and the claw hypothesis: a new perspective on the role of biogenic sulfur in the regulation of global climate.
Typical phenomena in the coral reef are, for example, coral bleaching under environmental stress and leading to widespread devastation of the corals by the outbreak of a starfish Acanthaster planci that feed on corals.
Bremert & Ormond (1981) reported Arothron hispidus feeding in the Red Sea on coral, tunicates, sea urchins and brittle stars, adding that it is a significant predator of the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster).