Acanthis


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Acanthis

 

(redpolls), a genus of birds of the family Fringillidae of the order Passeriformes. The birds are 12 to 14 cm long. The plumage is gray with speckles; males of the species A. flammea and A. hornemanni have a red or pink cap and breast. The genus comprises three species, distributed in Europe, Asia, and North America. All three occur in the USSR. The common redpoll (A. flammea) inhabits coniferous forests and forest tundra, Hornemann’s redpoll (A. hornemannis) inhabits the forest tundra, and the twite (A. flavirostris) is found on the Kola Peninsula, in the stony steppes of Kazakhstan, and in the mountains of the southern part of the USSR (from the Caucasus to the Altai). In winter the birds migrate in flocks. They build their nests in shrubs. A clutch contains four to six eggs, which are incubated 13 or 14 days. The diet consists of seeds.

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Propertius uses the figure of Cynthia, and particularly her direct speech, to weaken the boundaries between male and female, Roman and non-Roman, and lover and beloved; in Book 4 Acanthis and Cornelia join her and add their support to her critique.
Cynthia and Acanthis represent the experiences of women of the underclass, while Cornelia is a representative of the differently oppressed elite woman.
The central figure of this poem is the lena Acanthis, whose own speech (21-62) is framed by the lover-poet's commentary on her character, behavior, and death (1-20, 63-78).
K biologii i vzaimootnosheniyam obyknovennoi (Acanthis flammea) i tundryanoi (Acanthis hornemanni) chechotok na Kamchatke.
Second clutch of the Redpoll (Acanthis flammed) in Yamal Peninsula.
First, semantic understanding--that Propertius curses the lena Acanthis in 4.5.1-4 because the advice she has given to his amica runs contrary to his own interests.
If, in this mode of refiguration, we are directed by the appearance of Acanthis towards a (literal or imaginative) re-evaluation of the earlier books in the light of elegy 4.5, to re-view Cynthia's appearance and behavior as the effects of a lena's teachings, then it becomes 'logical' to expect that Propertius should include an account of the lena and her teachings at some point in his narrative.
(36) See Janan 2001, 86-7, who discusses how Gutzwiller modifies in a similar way Propertius 4.5, the Acanthis elegy (Gutzwiller 1985, 105-15).
Janan's observation that one of the themes that links the poems of Propertius's book 4 is the "uncanny appearance of truths about women that challenge received wisdom" (2001, 86); this is true, Janan says, only for the women who are dead (Acanthis in 4.5, Cynthia in 4.7, Cornelia in 4.11).