diacritic

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diacritic

A diacritic (or diacritical mark) is a mark added to a letter, usually to indicate a specific pronunciation of that letter.
Of the various languages using the Latin alphabet, English is one of the few that generally does not use diacritical marks. Those words that do contain them are typically foreign loanwords whose diacritics have been retained in English. The most common of these that appear in English are known as accents (either acute, as in café, or grave, as in vis-à-vis).
There are, however, a few diacritics that are used in native English words.
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diacritic

A small mark added to a letter that changes its pronunciation, such as an acute accent (á), a grave accent (à) and a cedilla (ç).
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References in periodicals archive ?
A series of three experiments was carried out to study the contrastive value of the stress and accent marks in Spanish.
I tried to write this renowned African writer's name correctly, with all the right accent marks, but this modern Western technology (laptop) is not programmed to respect "such" surnames and marks.
Other databases simply eliminate the accents entirely and just leave the letters without accent marks. Lastly, there are some (generally, but not only, Hispanic) databases that can respect the accent marks on names.
That means suffixes won't be able to include tildes, accent marks and other special characters.
Diacritical marks, which include accent marks, tildes, umlauts and other notations, help to distinguish one letter from another and aid in pronunciation.
At the end of his essay, Mosquera wryly notes that the accent marks in "Felix Gonzalez Torres," as he insists on writing it, will probably disappear with the translation of the text from Spanish to English.