nidamental gland

(redirected from Accessory nidamental gland)

nidamental gland

[¦nīd·ə¦ment·əl ′gland]
(zoology)
Any of various structures that secrete covering material for eggs or egg masses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The red accessory nidamental gland occurred more than 10 times during the entire video footage (Table 3), usually during the daytime, when the females positioned themselves parallel to the males.
The red accessory nidamental gland, lateral mantle spots, infraocular spots, dark fins, and shaded eye were rare in females.
The presence of a spermatophoric sac in males and the orange or pink color of the accessory nidamental gland in females indicated the mature stage (Richard 1967; Riad 1993).
Behavioral responses to natural eggs were compared with responses to artificial egg capsules coated with extracts (4) from one of four female reproductive organs or glands: ovary, oviducal gland, nidamental gland, or accessory nidamental gland.
In contrast, the nidamental gland produces the outer coating of the egg capsule (12), and the accessory nidamental gland is responsible for coating the eggs with bacteria that may deter pathogens or reduce predation (13).
A high incidence of infection (47%) was noted in the reproductive organs (nidamental gland, accessory nidamental gland, and gonads).
4 mm diameter), most often seen in reproductive tissues such as the testicular ducts and accessory nidamental glands (Fig.
Internal organs, such as the red accessory nidamental gland in females, are often visible.
The Red accessory nidamental gland can be seen through the translucent mantle and occurs only in fully mature females, so it may be a part of communication even though it is internal.
So that females could be selected, the gonad at the anterior end of the mantle cavity was first examined in thin sections by light microscopy; if it was judged to be an ovary, the sectioning was continued until the region of accessory nidamental gland was observed.
In sexually mature female cephalopods, the accessory nidamental gland (ANG) harbors a dense bacterial community (1, 2).
Besides indices, 1 of 3 maturity stages was assigned to the specimen collected in different seasons based on the color of accessory nidamental glands and size of the gonads according to Lipinski (1979).