accessory pigments

accessory pigments

[ak¦ses·ə·rē ′pig·məns]
(biochemistry)
Light-absorbing pigments, including carotenoids and phycobilins, which complement chlorophyll in plants, algae, and bacteria by trapping light energy for photosynthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to react to photosynthetic pigments damage, anthocyanins and flavonoids that act as accessory pigments protect the plant from the stress by removing reactive oxygen species [5].
Under drought stress Carotenoids are reduced and are not able to function as accessory pigments.
Anthocyanins also function as accessory pigments which protect the plant from water stress [5].
Among their changes are updating classifications of algae, modifying the section on the endosymbiosis and origin of eukaryotic photosynthesis, adding new types of root systems and algal swimming patterns, and adding the adsorption of spectra of all the chlorophylls and the accessory pigments.
To cope with widely fluctuating light levels, many phytoplankton have certain red accessory pigments called xanthophylls that act like gatekeepers.
Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments and antioxidants, which participate as accessory pigments in the light-absorption process of photosynthetic organisms.
Thus, it becomes necessary to study the effects that the light intensity can bring about, changes on the cyanobacterial light harvesting accessory pigments.
When shade-adapted leaves are placed in bright sunlight, they often bleach because the chlorophyll loses structure and there are few accessory pigments.
The accessory pigments are less subject to photo oxidation than chlorophyll and tend to last longer in the fall.
Photons of light may strike any of these accessory pigments to begin the chain reaction that eventually culminates in sugar formation.