Acetobacter


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Acetobacter

[ə′sēd·ō‚bak·tər]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria of uncertain affiliation comprising ellipsoidal to rod-shaped cells as singles, pairs, or chains; they oxidize ethanol to acetic acid. Also known as acetic acid bacteria; vinegar bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fertilisation of non-legume crops by N-fixing bacteria is of great importance, with strains of Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Acetobacter, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium being used as biofertiliser for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.
Studart's group members and first authors Patrick R'hs and Manuel Schaffner used the bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Acetobacter xylinum in their work.
In the other approach, cellulose can be prepared from the bacterial species Acetobacter xylinum, which is one of the most effective species for bacterial cellulose preparation and has high percent yield and uniform size and shape.
Nitrogen-fixing biofertilizers, such as Acetobacter, Azospirillum, Azotobacter, blue green algae (BGA) and Rhizobium, currently represent the biggest segment accounting for the majority of the market share.
Bio-fibers of the substrate are produced with bacteria (mainly acetobacter xylinum) and plant-derived materials like coconut milk and grain mash via bio-fermentation technology.
coli (with maximum of oxygen depleted after 1 min), lactate as best hydrogen donor for Gluconobacter oxydans (with maximum dissolved oxygen depleted in 2 minutes) and lactate and a-glycerophosphate as best hydrogen donors for Acetobacter xylinum (maximum oxygen dissolved oxygen depleted after 5 minutes).
1998) who reported gibberellins production in flooded rice by Acetobacter diazotrophicus and Herbaspirillum seropedicae in chemically defined culture media.
To the Editor: Acetobacter indonesiensis, first described in 2000 (1), belongs to the group of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), which includes the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Asaia, Granulibacter, and others in the family Acetobacteriaceae.
26] reported that acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter progression in grapes produces high level of acetic acid.
The pattern of microbial sensitivity to amikacin based on the report of Professor Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center in Nemazee Teaching Hospital, Shiraz, is as follows: Escherichia coli (91%), Pseudomonads (80%), Enterobacter (69%), Serratia (65%), Klebsiella (64%), and Acetobacter (36%).