acetogenic bacteria

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acetogenic bacteria

[‚a·sə·tō¦jen·ik bak′tir·ē·ə]
(biochemistry)
Anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing carbon dioxide to acetic acid or converting sugars into acetate.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the milieu, they discovered a spike in acetate made by bacteria called acetogens.
In the acetogen phase the broken elements are converted in to acetate (acetic acid) and finally we got the biogas comprises of methane (CH4), Hydrogen (H2), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and small proportion of Ammonia (NH3) and Hydrogen sulfide (H2S).
Acetogens have been shown to be powerful organisms in other industries such as wastewater treatment before ZeaChem began utilizing them for bio-based chemicals and fuels production.
He was also President of Nutri-Sol Chemical Company, Marine Insulation Company, Corban Industries and Acetogen Gas Company of Florida.
Canada) and Vallen Acetogen Safety Chile, operate from some 162 locations, including 69 on site/just in time locations.
Klieve believes it is possible to improve the ability of acetogens to out-compete the cattle methanogens, reduce GHGs and increase feed conversion efficiency.
Among the groups of hydrogenotrophs are methanogens (producing methane), acetogens (producing acetate), and sulfate reducing bacteria (producing [H.
This redirects H2 to other reductive rumen bacteria such as acetogens or propionate producers.
It has been found that none of the butyrate degrading acetogens can degrade propionate, while two independent studies reported that propionate-degrading granules can degrade butyrate (Mechichi, Sayadi 2005).
Acetogenesis--the simple molecules from acidogenesis are further digested by bacteria called acetogens to produce C[O.
Also known as the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, it is a non-cyclic route that synthesizes acetyl-CoA as the key intermediate and is mostly functional in archaea, especially the acetogens and methanogens.
Chlororespiring populations are highly competitive hydrogen users and outcompete methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate-reducing populations for this electron donor (Loffler et al.