acetogenic bacteria

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acetogenic bacteria

[‚a·sə·tō¦jen·ik bak′tir·ē·ə]
(biochemistry)
Anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing carbon dioxide to acetic acid or converting sugars into acetate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kleerebezem, "Limitation of syntrophic coculture growth by the acetogen," Biotechnology and Bioengineering, vol.
ljungdahlii as an ethanologenic acetogen presents a complex metabolic pathway which includes both acetogenic and solventogenic phases [19].
In the acetogen phase the broken elements are converted in to acetate (acetic acid) and finally we got the biogas comprises of methane (CH4), Hydrogen (H2), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and small proportion of Ammonia (NH3) and Hydrogen sulfide (H2S).
McAllister and Newbold (2008) reported that bacteriocins could prove effective in directly inhibiting methanogens and redirecting H2 to other reductive bacteria, such as propionate producers or acetogens.
According to Athol Klieve, a microbiologist at the University of Queensland, the aim would be to replace bacteria called methanogens that break down plant matter in cattle guts with a different type of bacteria called reductive acetogens. Klieve believes it is possible to improve the ability of acetogens to out-compete the cattle methanogens, reduce GHGs and increase feed conversion efficiency.
Among the groups of hydrogenotrophs are methanogens (producing methane), acetogens (producing acetate), and sulfate reducing bacteria (producing [H.sub.2]S).
This redirects H2 to other reductive rumen bacteria such as acetogens or propionate producers.
In the milieu, they discovered a spike in acetate made by bacteria called acetogens. These microbes compete with methanogens to use the carbon dioxide and hydrogen.
[H.sub.2] generated in the intestine is disposed by [H.sub.2] consuming bacteria such as methanogenic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and acetogens [22].
Muyzer, "Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio," Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol.
It has been found that none of the butyrate degrading acetogens can degrade propionate, while two independent studies reported that propionate-degrading granules can degrade butyrate (Mechichi, Sayadi 2005).
* Acetogenesis--the simple molecules from acidogenesis are further digested by bacteria called acetogens to produce C[O.sub.2], hydrogen and mainly acetic acid.