Achaea


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Achaea

(əkē`ə), region of ancient Greece, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus on the Gulf of Corinth. It lay between Sicyon and Elis. There the Achaeans supposedly remained when driven from other parts of Greece by the Dorian invasion. The small Achaean cities eventually banded together in the First Achaean LeagueAchaean League
, confederation of cities on the Gulf of Corinth. The First Achaean League, about which little is known, was formed presumably before the 5th cent. B.C. and lasted through the 4th cent. B.C. Its purpose was mutual protection against pirates.
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, but exerted little influence. Later, however, the Second Achaean League became an important factor. After the downfall of the league, the name Achaea, or Achaia, was given to a Roman province in the Peloponnesus.
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Achaea

, Achaia
1. a department of Greece, in the N Peloponnese. Capital: Patras. Pop.: 318 928 (2001). Area: 3209 sq. km (1239 sq. miles)
2. a province of ancient Greece, in the N Peloponnese on the Gulf of Corinth: enlarged as a Roman province in 27 bc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Use and reuse of the past: Case studies from Mycenaean Achaea. In MNHMH/MNEME: Past and Memory in the Aegean Bronze Age.
The temple of Octavia, the sister of Augustus, functioned as the center of the federal imperial cult of Achaea in Corinth.
The Athenians had to give up Nisaea and Pegae, as well as Achaea and Troezen (1.115).
It's just not fair that you, our leader, have botched things up so badly for us, Achaea's sons.
Next, Amelia Brown contributes an article on the Panhellenic sanctuaries in the Roman province of Achaea, including the famous sanctuary at Delphi.
(17) Nicolas Toro, "Bacterial and Achaea Group II Introns: Additional Mobile Genetic Elements in the Environment," Environmental Microbiology 5 (2003): 143-51.
(145) In particular, the experiences of Lycia and Achaea revealed that a confederated government could hold the power to regulate individuals without destroying the sovereignty of confederacy members.
"Late Roman Achaea: Identity and Defence," JRA 8, pp.
There is unequivocal evidence too that there was a Mycenean presence in the Troad, and the kingdom of Ahhiyawa, very likely Homer's Achaea (mainland Greece), appears prominently as an aggressive power in contemporary diplomatic records of the Hittite king.
(54) Nero had proclaimed the freedom of the province of Achaea in 67 C.E.; note that in Plutarch's On the Delays of Divine Vengeance (32), the cruel punishment destined for Nero is mitigated, since the gods owe him gratitude for freeing "the noblest and most beloved of Heaven."
Polycrates, in Eusebius, HE 5.24.5, `Melito the eunuch, who lived entirely in the Holy Spirit, who lies at Sardis ...'.) Koester thinks the next section of the prologue is later, but it continues, `Since there were already other gospels, that According to Matthew written in Judea, that According to Mark [written in] Italy, he was urged by the Holy Spirit to write his whole gospel among those in the regions of Achaea, as he indicates this in the preface that there were already other writings before him ...'.
attaches some weight to Polybius' claim that democracy went way back in Achaea, since it was adopted by the sons of king Ogygos (73-5), when such a statement is hardly more reliable than claims that Theseus adopted it in Athens.