Achaea


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Achaea

(əkē`ə), region of ancient Greece, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus on the Gulf of Corinth. It lay between Sicyon and Elis. There the Achaeans supposedly remained when driven from other parts of Greece by the Dorian invasion. The small Achaean cities eventually banded together in the First Achaean LeagueAchaean League
, confederation of cities on the Gulf of Corinth. The First Achaean League, about which little is known, was formed presumably before the 5th cent. B.C. and lasted through the 4th cent. B.C. Its purpose was mutual protection against pirates.
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, but exerted little influence. Later, however, the Second Achaean League became an important factor. After the downfall of the league, the name Achaea, or Achaia, was given to a Roman province in the Peloponnesus.

Achaea

, Achaia
1. a department of Greece, in the N Peloponnese. Capital: Patras. Pop.: 318 928 (2001). Area: 3209 sq. km (1239 sq. miles)
2. a province of ancient Greece, in the N Peloponnese on the Gulf of Corinth: enlarged as a Roman province in 27 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
The temple of Octavia, the sister of Augustus, functioned as the center of the federal imperial cult of Achaea in Corinth.
During the First Peloponnesian War, the Athenians had set up at Nisaea, Pegae, Achaea, and Naupactus bases that would have enabled them to expand toward the west.
Koester thinks the next section of the prologue is later, but it continues, `Since there were already other gospels, that According to Matthew written in Judea, that According to Mark [written in] Italy, he was urged by the Holy Spirit to write his whole gospel among those in the regions of Achaea, as he indicates this in the preface that there were already other writings before him .
attaches some weight to Polybius' claim that democracy went way back in Achaea, since it was adopted by the sons of king Ogygos (73-5), when such a statement is hardly more reliable than claims that Theseus adopted it in Athens.
When he uses [Unknown Words Omitted], the ideas are more closely connected, `the Crotoniates are from Achaea by descent', `the Melians being from Sparta by descent'.
Son of the Eurypontid king Archidamus III, became king on his father's death (338); hoping to take advantage of Alexander's absence in Asia, he planned a revolt against Macedonian rule in Greece; aided by Persian money and ships, he assembled an army of 8,000 men, largely Greek mercenaries lately in Persian service (333), and won several battles in Crete and the Peleponnesus against pro-Macedonian forces (333-332); gained the support of Elis, Achaea, and Arcadia (provinces of the Peloponnese), except for the cities of Pellene and Megalopolis; besieged Megalopolis, but his outnumbered army was destroyed by the army of Macedonian regent Antipater (Antipatros), and he was killed in battle (331).
He admitted some into the small towns of the Cilicians in Anatolia, and others he planted in the city of the Solians, also in Anatolia; to the majority he granted land in the ancient Greek province of Achaea to call their own and cultivate.
But Odysseus far away has lost his return to the land of Achaea, and is lost himself.
To take the hockey analogy further, Euplous may well have been a minor-league driver competing at entertainments in the smaller cities of mainland Greece, which would surely have included Corinth, the capital of Achaea and the seat of the provincial governor.
Pallottino Richardson (all-purpose) (subjects) Barker/Rasmussen Aborigines Aborigines Abruzzo l'Accessa, Lake Aequi Achilles Acerra Agrimensores Acqua-Acetosa Achaea Alphabet Acquarossa (13 refs) Acqua Rossa (supp) Appeninic peoples Adonis Adige Architecture Adria Adria (1 column) Aegean Adriatic Arx Aelian Aegean Augury aes rude (see coins) Aegean Aurini afterlife Aegeo-Asianic ling.
Before that he attended the Council of Serdica (343) in the function of comes as a representative of Constantius II;(2) he was proconsul of Achaea (after 351 and before 353) and possibly (also before 353) proconsul of the city of Constantinople.
How shameful of you, the high and mighty commander, To lead the sons of Achaea into bloody slaughter