achalasia

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achalasia

[‚ak·ə′lāzh·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Inability of a hollow muscular organ or ring of muscle (sphincter) to relax.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship of manometric findings to symptomatic response after pneumatic dilatation in achalasia cardia. Indian J Gastroenterol 1998;17:19-21.
It was first discovered by Allgrove in 1978 in two pairs of siblings.1 This syndrome consists of triad of achalasia cardia, alacrima and adrenal hypoplasia.2 Other signs and symptoms of progressive central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system involvement may also be present.3 Vahedi M has reported achalasia to be the first manifestation of Allgrove syndrome.4 Clinical presentation of this rare disorder comprise of weakness, fatigue, vomiting, anorexia, abdominal pain, constipation, postural dizziness, hypotension, hyperpigmentation, electrolyte imbalance, vitiligo, alacrima (absence of tear production or reduced tear production) and achalasia.1,5
Total number of 40 patients of dysphagia due to benign oesophageal strictures were studied, out of which, 16 (40%) patients were of corrosive strictures, 14 (35%) having achalasia cardia and 10 (25%) of peptic strictures (Table 1).
Eighteen cases of achalasia cardia based on clinical, barium and endoscopic findings were included in the sample using non probability purposive sampling technique.
Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception: an exceedingly rare complication of Heller myotomy in a patient with achalasia cardia. Turk J Gastroenterol 2017; 28: 316-8.
Pneumatic Balloon Dilation of Achalasia Cardia. J Surg Pak 2015; 20:1-4.
Achalasia cardia is a neuromuscular disorder of unknown aetiology, rarely described in children and adolescents: The symptoms include dysphagia, vomiting/ regurgitation of food, retrosternal pain, poor growth and respiratory symptoms due to chronic aspiration.
Achalasia cardia and gastric outlet stenosis in a postmenopausal woman: case report.
Summary: The 73-year-old patient had Achalasia Cardia, a serious condition caused by the absence of nerves in esophagus.
The etiology for dysphagia included carcinoma esophagus (11), carcinoma larynx (10), carcinoma hypopharynx (08), cerebrovascular accident (05), esophageal candidiasis (03), stricture (02), oral malignancy (02); TB of upper aerodigestive tract (02), esophageal web (02), drug induced esophageal ulcer (01), extrinsic compression (01), scleroderma (01), achalasia cardia (01) and myasthenia gravis (01).
Objectives: To evaluate relief of dysphagia and appearance of reflux symptoms in patients of achalasia cardia treated with Tran's abdominal cardiomyotomy and anterior Dor patch.