Achernar


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Achernar

(ā`kərnär'), brightest star in the constellation EridanusEridanus
, large southern constellation stretching SW from Orion for about 60°. Because of its long, winding shape it was identified with a river by many ancient civilizations; e.g., the Egyptians called it the Nile and the Babylonians called it the Euphrates.
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; Bayer designation α Eridani; 1992 position R.A. 1h37.4m, Dec. −57°16'. A bluish-white white star with apparent magnitudemagnitude,
in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The stars cataloged by Ptolemy (2d cent. A.D.), all visible with the unaided eye, were ranked on a brightness scale such that the brightest stars were of 1st magnitude and the dimmest stars
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 0.51, it is one of the 10 brightest stars in the entire sky. Its distance is about 120 light-years, and its luminosity about 600 times that of the sun. Achernar is of spectral classspectral class,
in astronomy, a classification of the stars by their spectrum and luminosity. In 1885, E. C. Pickering began the first extensive attempt to classify the stars spectroscopically.
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 B5 V. Its name is from the Arabic meaning "end of the river [Eridanus]."

Achernar

(ay -ker-nar) (α Eri) A conspicuous bluish-white star that is the brightest in the constellation Eridanus. mv : 0.5; Mv : –1.3; spectral type: B3 Vnp; distance: 22 pc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a point of interest, the Southern star Achernar, has a tremendous oblateness which approaches 1.
By its industry diversification and ability to quickly respond to changes in market demands, Achernar provides specialty labels for the food, fruit, cosmetics, pharmaceutical, electronic, lubricant and postal service industries.
That makes Achernar the flattest star known, report Pierre Kervella of the European Southern Observatory in Santiago, Chile, and his colleagues in an upcoming Astronomy & Astrophysics.
All Indian Ocean navigators favored the use of stars on the meridian for determining latitude: first the Pole Star, and when that star was beclouded or below the horizon, they switched to some other star at culmination,(5) such as |Beta~ Ursae Minoris (the Greater Farqad), the brightest star in the vicinity of the North Pole, or Achernar (sulbar) in the Southern Hemisphere.
Achernar in the central Transantarctic Mountains, are at about 82 degrees south latitude.
The south celestial pole can be found midway along the line joining Crux to Achernar.
One of them is a clockwise swirl a little north of the star Achernar in Eridanus.
The long axis of the Southern Cross points towards a bright star called Achernar.
Towards the south lies Achernar in the constellation Eridanus.
The most significant of these, at present, appears to be the southern star Achernar, a hot B-type star with a mass currently estimated at six times the mass of the Sun.
Shoemaker (660) 773-5313 NMC40 Seabees (all eras): Edward Holston (609) 875-1300 Patrol Craft Sailors Assn: Mark Matyas (818) 363-2917 USS Achernar AKA53: Wayne T.